African Descendants ✊🏿 Black People - Americas, Africa, Caribbean Culture Discussion

80
89
Joined May 7, 2019
Late as hell to this thread but I was born in Haiti and moved to the states when I was 11. I’m what they would call a “mulatto” Haitian in Haiti but I identify with my African Roots way more than I do with any of my European roots, I think that’s the case with all Haitians. There is too much African roots in our culture for us to not identify with that more. Even most white Haitians I know are very African culturally.
 
3,678
2,979
Joined Aug 27, 2013
Fellas, this isnt about individuals, this thread isnt about "black men tell us how individuals should feel" Its about the group. The black world. I can be a Christian and feel at peace all day knowing an imaginary white saviour will give me salvation in the sky when , but when I look around at the state of the black world I can say one of it is our blind allegiance to a faith that hasn't produced for us.

Right off the bat, Jamaica has the most churches on Earth per square mile, yet our economy is in the dumps and our murder rate is always top 10 in the world.

So wtf is being a Christian doing for us? Ivory Coast just built the worlds largest cathedral overlooking their capital yet they rank in the top 5% poorest countries on Earth.

Something just have to give man, we are sooooo behind as a people its not even funny.
 
9,877
6,798
Joined May 14, 2013
Fellas, this isnt about individuals, this thread isnt about "black men tell us how individuals should feel" Its about the group. The black world. I can be a Christian and feel at peace all day knowing an imaginary white saviour will give me salvation in the sky when , but when I look around at the state of the black world I can say one of it is our blind allegiance to a faith that hasn't produced for us.

Right off the bat, Jamaica has the most churches on Earth per square mile, yet our economy is in the dumps and our murder rate is always top 10 in the world.

So wtf is being a Christian doing for us? Ivory Coast just built the worlds largest cathedral overlooking their capital yet they rank in the top 5% poorest countries on Earth.

Something just have to give man, we are sooooo behind as a people its not even funny.
is It possible for you to comment on something you disagree with without being wildly disrespectful to what to other people and what they believe? And it’s not just the religious stuff either. Trying to have a civil discussion with you in some threads can feel like pulling teeth sometimes.

“faith without works is dead” no amount of churches, buildings, or strongly held beliefs are going to do anything for anyone with out agency. how about instead of disparaging the beliefs of people at the table with you, find out ways to bring more people to the table to work towards a common goal.
 
Last edited:
3,678
2,979
Joined Aug 27, 2013
is It possible for you to comment on something you disagree with without being wildly disrespectful to what to other people and what they believe? And it’s not just the religious stuff either. Trying to have a civil discussion with you in some threads can feel like pulling teeth sometimes.

“faith without works is dead” no amount of churches, buildings, or strongly held beliefs are going to do anything for anyone with out agency. Period.
I didnt quote anyone directly and I wasnt speaking to anyone directly , thats me talking out loud and (Im assuming) we are all grown black men in here, so im not here to sugarcoat so I wont offend anyone of their beliefs. People can believe anything they want, I dont care. I will voice my displeasure when something frustrates me with the world. Period
 

alchemist iq

Supporter
31,409
35,881
Joined May 12, 2008
I didnt quote anyone directly and I wasnt speaking to anyone directly , thats me talking out loud and (Im assuming) we are all grown black men in here, so im not here to sugarcoat so I wont offend anyone of their beliefs. People can believe anything they want, I dont care. I will voice my displeasure when something frustrates me with the world. Period
You still sound like a "moist Jamaican" though. ??‍♂ Period.
 
3,444
5,396
Joined Nov 16, 2018
I didnt quote anyone directly and I wasnt speaking to anyone directly , thats me talking out loud and (Im assuming) we are all grown black men in here, so im not here to sugarcoat so I wont offend anyone of their beliefs. People can believe anything they want, I dont care. I will voice my displeasure when something frustrates me with the world. Period
mind i ask; what is ur religious background, if u have one?
 
3,678
2,979
Joined Aug 27, 2013
marikomorose marikomorose typical black people grew up in Baptist Jamaica household. Im not religious at all as an adult, we live and we die. We are technically just advanced organism. Thats it, I believe more in basic science stuff than anything religious. I will go to church with my mother like 2wice a year to show her support but I dont care for religion at all.
 
7,810
13,373
Joined Jan 16, 2011
long story short I got them to admit that they didnt like it for personal reasons as opposed to it being some offense to God.
It always comes down to that. Religious authority is too often used as a substitute for parental authority.
I always questioned my family why they do not follow their ancestor's original religion, Ifa. Funny enough, I think my Pops started secretly following it as of late.
Contrary to popular belief, Christianity and Islam didn't eliminate traditional African beliefs in most places they were introduced. They got adapted to local customs and belief systems in order to become relevant. The result is an interesting situation where African believers will go to church/the mosque on Sundays/Fridays while wearing the medecine man's (marabout) amulet during the six other days of the week.

Furthermore, people still make a conscious effort to abide by some traditional religious practices, especially for important life events such as birth, marriage, death in order to preserve their cultural identity.
 
9,877
6,798
Joined May 14, 2013
It always comes down to that. Religious authority is too often used as a substitute for parental authority.

Contrary to popular belief, Christianity and Islam didn't eliminate traditional African beliefs in most places they were introduced. They got adapted to local customs and belief systems in order to become relevant. The result is an interesting situation where African believers will go to church/the mosque on Sundays/Fridays while wearing the medecine man's (marabout) amulet during the six other days of the week.

Furthermore, people still make a conscious effort to abide by some traditional religious practices, especially for important life events such as birth, marriage, death in order to preserve their cultural identity.
Absolutely. Haitians are very much like the way you described in your second post
 
3,664
4,872
Joined Dec 13, 2018
It always comes down to that. Religious authority is too often used as a substitute for parental authority.

Contrary to popular belief, Christianity and Islam didn't eliminate traditional African beliefs in most places they were introduced. They got adapted to local customs and belief systems in order to become relevant. The result is an interesting situation where African believers will go to church/the mosque on Sundays/Fridays while wearing the medecine man's (marabout) amulet during the six other days of the week.

Furthermore, people still make a conscious effort to abide by some traditional religious practices, especially for important life events such as birth, marriage, death in order to preserve their cultural identity.
In other words, they were diluted.
 
3,727
878
Joined Aug 22, 2007
I’ve always wanted to discuss the cultural differences between US/African/Caribbean born blacks but I’ve never had a respectful place to do it.

Being a black man born in the US (parents as well) and dating Haitian, Nigerian, Jamaican women has really opened my eyes to how others view black Americans.
 
3,624
1,621
Joined Jan 25, 2013
A hard thing for Africans to grasp is that regardless of their culture, you are still viewed as an african american until proven otherwise.

A good example was when I was in college. I usually formed study groups with foreigners like middle eastern, Hispanics, Asians or "outcast" white americans. During finals a group of african americans came to the library and instead of studying decided to play music, chill, laugh and hangout. One of the dudes in my group, Egyptian, told me "Wow you're arent really black, you dont do any of what they are doing." Indirectly he was telling me that he know I was Nigerian but didnt care, I was still black in his eyes until he got to know me.
 
Last edited:
3,664
4,872
Joined Dec 13, 2018
By "they," what are you referring to?
The African traditions.
Contrary to popular belief, Christianity and Islam didn't eliminate traditional African beliefs in most places they were introduced. They got adapted to local customs and belief systems in order to become relevant.

Christianity and Islam dilutes the power of ancestral worship/tradition, which is a pillar of African belief systems. Instead of venerating the ancestors, christians venerate christ, while muslims venerate muhammad. Without the ancestors being venerated, spirits that have no ancestral connection are empowered.

Go into these churches with Black parishioners, and Jesus is white and it wasn't until the Nation Of Islam came around, that people began to connect Black people with Islam in north america.
 
3,664
4,872
Joined Dec 13, 2018
A hard thing for Africans to grasp is that regardless of their culture, you are still viewed as an african american until proven otherwise.

A good example was when I was in college. I usually formed study groups with foreigners like middle eastern, Hispanics, Asians or "outcast" white americans. During finals a group of african americans came to the library and instead of studying decided to play music, chill, laugh and hangout. One of the dudes in my group, Egyptian, told me "Wow your arent really black, you dont do any of what they are doing." Indirectly he was telling me that he know I was Nigerian but didnt care, I was still black in his eyes until he got to know me.
Were you insulted by his comment?
 
3,678
2,979
Joined Aug 27, 2013
What we all gotta realize is that at the end of the day we are ALL BLACK. Yes, there are cultural and national differences. It is what happens when people are separated for hundreds of years. However, when you evolved for thousands of years together on the continent of Africa the couple hundred years differences pale in comparison to the bond that thousands of years have.

We all have our culture things I like dancehall and jerk pork, Afro-Americans like grits and waffles, Nigerians like jollof rice, Trinidadians like steel pan and soca music but for the most part our culture derives from African culture

We all got rhythm, we all like big booty black women (especially me), we all can dance better than others, we all got nappy hair naturally.

Its either youre gonna let 300 years divide you OR you let 10,000 years unite you.

The choice is yours brothers
 
3,624
1,621
Joined Jan 25, 2013
Were you insulted by his comment?
I was conflicted but at the same time use to backhanded compliments. Plus I am in constant conflict with two cultures and relate them both.

Like I get where he is coming from and I understand the actions of the african americans that day. His comment lacked understanding which is common.
 
8,716
4,893
Joined Dec 11, 2007
A hard thing for Africans to grasp is that regardless of their culture, you are still viewed as an african american until proven otherwise.

A good example was when I was in college. I usually formed study groups with foreigners like middle eastern, Hispanics, Asians or "outcast" white americans. During finals a group of african americans came to the library and instead of studying decided to play music, chill, laugh and hangout. One of the dudes in my group, Egyptian, told me "Wow your arent really black, you dont do any of what they are doing." Indirectly he was telling me that he know I was Nigerian but didnt care, I was still black in his eyes until he got to know me.
What are you really saying here? And Egyptian dude woulda got checked early for even thinking he could come to me with that BS.

I'm not sure if you agree with his sentiments, if only slightly, or if you're just making an observation.
 
3,444
5,396
Joined Nov 16, 2018
I’ve always wanted to discuss the cultural differences between US/African/Caribbean born blacks but I’ve never had a respectful place to do it.

Being a black man born in the US (parents as well) and dating Haitian, Nigerian, Jamaican women has really opened my eyes to how others view black Americans.
c'mon dawg, u just gonna leave us w/ a cliffhanger? elaborate on that last sentence please.
 
3,664
4,872
Joined Dec 13, 2018
I was conflicted but at the same time use to backhanded compliments. Plus I am in constant conflict with two cultures and relate them both.

Like I get where he is coming from and I understand the actions of the african americans that day. His comment lacked understanding which is common.
Understood.
It does prove how that if you are a minority, you can still contribute to the image of white supremacy. His downward look toward Black people proves that only white people are allowed to enjoy themselves, without appearing stereotypical, lazy and disruptive.

I would have had no issue with belting him in the mouth.
 
3,624
1,621
Joined Jan 25, 2013
What are you really saying here? And Egyptian dude woulda got checked early for even thinking he could come to me with that BS.

I'm not sure if you agree with his sentiments, if only slightly, or if you're just making an observation.
My biggest take aways were:

1.) Egyptian dude doesnt even know he is viewed as black too. Straight talking out his a**.

2.) The African americans were doing what they like and I didnt see a problem with it because I have been there before

3.) White supremacy runs deep and in many forms

4.) No matter what you do and how you present yourself, you will always be labeled as black.
 
Top Bottom