Black Culture Discussion Thread

Diego Pasta

formerly utep2step
3,050
4,647
Joined Jan 6, 2014
Can't cosign this :smh:

I don't cosign it but unfortunately that is the platform that has been opened since the turn of the century, lotta rappers give they fans an n word pass but them folks be the same ones that make blue lives matter tweets.
 
4,179
3,379
Joined Aug 27, 2013
Shaq is a smart business man and very successful in the money making world.

I doubt he cares about anything to do with blackness. Not surprised
 

Present

Supporter
924
1,889
Joined Apr 15, 2018
Y'all do know Shaq is a Platinum and Gold selling rapper / recording artist right?

Around 1993, O'Neal was signed to Jive Records where he released his debut album, Shaq Diesel, in that year. The album peaked at number 25 on the Billboard 200, number 10 on R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, and was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

Studio albums: 4
Soundtrack albums: 2
Unreleased albums: 1
Singles: 9

 
4,179
3,379
Joined Aug 27, 2013
We all know Shaq is an accomplished rapper.

why did he have to sing a song knowing that the n word gonna be all over it and the crowd is mainly white kids that will sing along to it.

these people have no ounce of black pride in them, sad.
 
5,607
4,064
Joined Jan 16, 2016
I mean if I'm at a Hov concert I'm rapping every word to Big Pimpin but I'm not gonna leave that show and call women on the street B's. It's a time and place. :lol:
Not implying I feel one way or the other about it. Just asking based on your comparison.

Is singing the lyrics at a rap concert of your favorite artist not the appropriate time (if there ever is one) to drop it?

Truthfully, your example was one I never thought of. Got me thinking a bit.
 
4,712
6,217
Joined Dec 13, 2018
I go to concerts, I simply do not go to hip hop concerts. Jazz @ Lincoln Center is pure hipness, and even though those concerts are mainly attended by white out of town/ tourists, I get to hear some fantastic musicians playing the most creative music, without spitting the N word at the delight of the white fan base.

Much to my chagrin, I must agree with Stanley Crouch and Wynton Marsalis when they stated about ten, twenty years ago, that Hip Hop had bowed down to minstrelsy. Initially when they broached the topic, I vehemently disagreed with their position stating culture, and how and why the genre began. So when I see the vids uniting Black artists and white fans under the guise of the Nword, I am appalled that these so called artists feel as if they are unifying, and then are being embraced, by these so called fans.
 
56,203
52,961
Joined Jan 2, 2010
Not implying I feel one way or the other about it. Just asking based on your comparison.

Is singing the lyrics at a rap concert of your favorite artist not the appropriate time (if there ever is one) to drop it?

Truthfully, your example was one I never thought of. Got me thinking a bit.
To me it's one of those situations where it is what it is. I don't know if it's appropriate or not. In music it's a lot of things said that's not fit for normal settings.

I rap along to a whole bunch of Suga Free songs but it ain't saying 'em on a date. :lol:
 
4,712
6,217
Joined Dec 13, 2018


Cape Up” is Jonathan’s weekly podcast talking to key figures behind the news and our culture. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.
“My words are not that powerful. I started saying in 1985 I don’t think we should have a music talking about ******s and *****es and ****. It had no impact. I’ve said it. I’ve repeated it. I still repeat it. To me that’s more damaging than a statue of Robert E. Lee.”
Wynton Marsalis covered all the bases. Race. His role in New Orleans’s removal of Confederate statues last year. His deep antipathy to rap and hip-hop. And the damage he believes the genres inflict on African Americans. “I feel that that’s much more of a racial issue than taking Robert E. Lee’s statue down,” Marsalis told me in t
he latest episode of “Cape Up.” “There’s more ******s in that than there is in Robert E. Lee’s statue.”
 
4,179
3,379
Joined Aug 27, 2013


Cape Up” is Jonathan’s weekly podcast talking to key figures behind the news and our culture. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.
“My words are not that powerful. I started saying in 1985 I don’t think we should have a music talking about ******s and *****es and ****. It had no impact. I’ve said it. I’ve repeated it. I still repeat it. To me that’s more damaging than a statue of Robert E. Lee.”
Wynton Marsalis covered all the bases. Race. His role in New Orleans’s removal of Confederate statues last year. His deep antipathy to rap and hip-hop. And the damage he believes the genres inflict on African Americans. “I feel that that’s much more of a racial issue than taking Robert E. Lee’s statue down,” Marsalis told me in t
he latest episode of “Cape Up.” “There’s more ******s in that than there is in Robert E. Lee’s statue.”
I hate those Respectable Politic negroes like him. So the expression of the youths in the ghettos are more damaging than the legacy of Civil War where people were trying to keep you enslaved?

Also, before you go after the black kids rapping to make ends meet go after the rich white Jewish executive label heads thats putting out those music.
 
4,712
6,217
Joined Dec 13, 2018
I hate those Respectable Politic negroes like him. So the expression of the youths in the ghettos are more damaging than the legacy of Civil War where people were trying to keep you enslaved?

Also, before you go after the black kids rapping to make ends meet go after the rich white Jewish executive label heads thats putting out those music.
lol, while Wynton isn't perfect, you aren't going to find a more Black empowerment type a brother than he.
Wynton is ALL Black, and there is nothing respectable about his position on being Black in this world.
 

wr

8,749
5,575
Joined Mar 4, 2011
I feel like a **** at rap concerts. All those out of touch white and Mexican kids saying N***** makes me feel like Target and probably what my ancestors heard before a lynching.
 
10,213
17,018
Joined Nov 16, 2018
I feel like a **** at rap concerts. All those out of touch white and Mexican kids saying N***** makes me feel like Target and probably what my ancestors heard before a lynching.
I've never gone to rap concerts for this very reason. I don't think I'd enjoy it as much as I'd want to due to the fact that a whole bunch of others are screaming "*****!"
 

Present

Supporter
924
1,889
Joined Apr 15, 2018


Cape Up” is Jonathan’s weekly podcast talking to key figures behind the news and our culture. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and anywhere else you listen to podcasts.
“My words are not that powerful. I started saying in 1985 I don’t think we should have a music talking about ******s and *****es and ****. It had no impact. I’ve said it. I’ve repeated it. I still repeat it. To me that’s more damaging than a statue of Robert E. Lee.”
Wynton Marsalis covered all the bases. Race. His role in New Orleans’s removal of Confederate statues last year. His deep antipathy to rap and hip-hop. And the damage he believes the genres inflict on African Americans. “I feel that that’s much more of a racial issue than taking Robert E. Lee’s statue down,” Marsalis told me in t
he latest episode of “Cape Up.” “There’s more ******s in that than there is in Robert E. Lee’s statue.”

I agree with Marsalis 100%!!!

"You can’t have a pipeline of filth be your default position” and not have it take a toll on society, Marsalis told me. “It’s just like the toll the minstrel show took on black folks and on white folks. Now, all this ‘****** this,’ ‘***** that,’ ‘ho that,’ that’s just a fact at this point. For me, it was not a default position in the ’80s. Now that it is the default position, how you like me now? You like what it’s yielding? Something is wrong with you — you need your head examined if you like this.”
 

wr

8,749
5,575
Joined Mar 4, 2011
I'll say it. I'm too embarrassed to enjoy listening to rap music publicly. Especially around other races.
 
Top Bottom
  AdBlock Detected

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks some useful and important features of our website. For the best possible site experience please take a moment to disable your AdBlocker or head over to our upgrade page to donate for an ad-free experience Upgrade now