BLACK HISTORY MONTH THREAD

dame theory

Banned
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Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

Originally Posted by ServeChilled81

Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

airmaxpenny1 wrot

Also happen to be gay
who is this?
Bayard Rustin
i looked him up......thanks


Today, blacks are no longer the litmus paper or the barometer of social change. Blacks are in every segment of society and there are laws that help to protect them from racial discrimination. The new "ni%%ers" are gays. . . . It is in this sense that gay people are the new barometer for social change. . . . The question of social change should be framed with the most vulnerable group in mind: gay people.




interesting
    

...and atheists...
 
11,942
11
Joined Apr 8, 2009
Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

Originally Posted by ServeChilled81

Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

airmaxpenny1 wrot

Also happen to be gay
who is this?
Bayard Rustin
i looked him up......thanks


Today, blacks are no longer the litmus paper or the barometer of social change. Blacks are in every segment of society and there are laws that help to protect them from racial discrimination. The new "ni%%ers" are gays. . . . It is in this sense that gay people are the new barometer for social change. . . . The question of social change should be framed with the most vulnerable group in mind: gay people.




interesting
    
Ayo.
Think about it. 
 
11,942
11
Joined Apr 8, 2009
Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

Originally Posted by ServeChilled81

Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

airmaxpenny1 wrot

Also happen to be gay
who is this?
Bayard Rustin
i looked him up......thanks


Today, blacks are no longer the litmus paper or the barometer of social change. Blacks are in every segment of society and there are laws that help to protect them from racial discrimination. The new "ni%%ers" are gays. . . . It is in this sense that gay people are the new barometer for social change. . . . The question of social change should be framed with the most vulnerable group in mind: gay people.




interesting
    
Ayo.
Think about it. 
 
9,255
2,231
Joined Mar 13, 2008
Originally Posted by GottaBdaShoes



Originally Posted by cguy610

Originally Posted by GottaBdaShoes

The accomplishments are fine. That's wonderful. As Americans, we should be proud of achievements made by other Americans. What does being black have to do with it? It's in the past, let it go and move on. Besides, none of the wrongs were done to you. People are screwed up and living in the past. Once they let this color barrier thing go, all of us might live more peaceful. It's too bad I won't be around in a couple hundred years when our brains evolve and get past this ignorance.
Care to elaborate on what is "ignorant" or who said we were "unequal"?  Who said we aren't proud of achievements made by other Americans? 

Your thought process and logic is awful.  Awfully stupid. 
Obviously you don't know how to process what you read the first time around. I'm saying that we should be proud of Americans and their achievements as a whole without considering whether they're black, purple, yellow, or any other color.

Besides, where in my post does it say anything about being "unequal?" Where does it say that no one else is proud of achievements by Americans?
Your reading ability is awful so you shouldn't be commenting on anyone else's mental capabilities until you fix your own problems.
So you can't elaborate on what you think is "ignorant" and who or what implied that we were "unequal". Your first post said we were supposed to be "equal" which means that someone or something implied that we were "unequal".   http://niketalk.yuku.com/...ACK-HISTORY-MONTH-THREAD

Just do everyone a favor in here and just leave this thread and start a new thread if your goal is to argue or to bash Black Americans.  These questions about why BET, HBCU's, and Black History month  exist have been answered countless times.
 
9,255
2,231
Joined Mar 13, 2008
Originally Posted by GottaBdaShoes



Originally Posted by cguy610

Originally Posted by GottaBdaShoes

The accomplishments are fine. That's wonderful. As Americans, we should be proud of achievements made by other Americans. What does being black have to do with it? It's in the past, let it go and move on. Besides, none of the wrongs were done to you. People are screwed up and living in the past. Once they let this color barrier thing go, all of us might live more peaceful. It's too bad I won't be around in a couple hundred years when our brains evolve and get past this ignorance.
Care to elaborate on what is "ignorant" or who said we were "unequal"?  Who said we aren't proud of achievements made by other Americans? 

Your thought process and logic is awful.  Awfully stupid. 
Obviously you don't know how to process what you read the first time around. I'm saying that we should be proud of Americans and their achievements as a whole without considering whether they're black, purple, yellow, or any other color.

Besides, where in my post does it say anything about being "unequal?" Where does it say that no one else is proud of achievements by Americans?
Your reading ability is awful so you shouldn't be commenting on anyone else's mental capabilities until you fix your own problems.
So you can't elaborate on what you think is "ignorant" and who or what implied that we were "unequal". Your first post said we were supposed to be "equal" which means that someone or something implied that we were "unequal".   http://niketalk.yuku.com/...ACK-HISTORY-MONTH-THREAD

Just do everyone a favor in here and just leave this thread and start a new thread if your goal is to argue or to bash Black Americans.  These questions about why BET, HBCU's, and Black History month  exist have been answered countless times.
 
4,291
366
Joined Oct 24, 2007
Originally Posted by 0cks


http://[h1]Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr.[/h1]
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation,search
[table][tr][th=""]Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr.[/th][/tr][tr][td][img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0b/Robertlawrence.jpg[/img][/td][/tr][tr][th=""]USAF Astronaut[/th][/tr][tr][th="row"]Nationality[/th][td]American[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Status[/th][td]Killed during training[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Born[/th][td]October 2, 1935(1935-10-02)
Chicago, Illinois[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Died[/th][td]December 8, 1967(1967-12-08) (aged 32)
Edwards Air Force Base, California[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Other occupation[/th][td]Test pilot[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Rank[/th][td]Major, USAF[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Time in space[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Selection[/th][td]1967 USAF MOL Group[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Missions[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Mission insignia[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][/table]
Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr. (October 2, 1935 - December 8, 1967) was a United States Air Force officer and the first African-American astronaut.[sup][1][/sup]
[table][tr][td]
[h2]Contents[/h2]
  • 1 Early years
  • 2 Military career
  • 3 References
  • 4 External links
[/td][/tr][/table][h2][edit] Early years[/h2]
At the age of 16, he graduated in the top 10 percent from Englewood High School in Chicago. At the age of 20, he graduated from Bradley University with a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry. At Bradley, he distinguished himself as Cadet Commander in the Air Force ROTC and received the commission of Second Lieutenant in the Air Force Reserve Program.

At the age of 21 he was designated as a U.S. Air Force pilot after completing flight training at Malden Air Force Base.

At 22, he married Barbara Cress, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Cress of Chicago. By the time he was 25, he had completed an Air Force assignment as an instructor pilot in the T-33 training aircraft for the German Air Force.

In 1965, Lawrence earned a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Ohio State University.[sup][2][/sup] His dissertation related to that part of chemistry which involved the conversion of tritium rays to methane gas.[sup][3][/sup]
[h2][edit] Military career[/h2]
He was a senior USAF pilot, accumulating well over 2,500 flight hours—2,000 of which were in jets. Lawrence flew many tests in the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter to investigate the gliding flight of various unpowered spacecraft returning to Earth from orbit, such as the North American X-15 rocket-plane. NASA cited Lawrence for accomplishments and flight maneuver data that "contributed greatly to the development of the Space Shuttle."[sup][1][/sup]

In June 1967, Lawrence successfully completed the Air Force Flight Test Pilot Training School at Edwards AFB, California. That same month he was selected by the USAF as an astronaut in the Air Force's Manned Orbital Laboratory (MOL) program, thus becoming the first black astronaut.

Lawrence was killed on December 8, 1967, in the crash of an F-104 Starfighter at Edwards Air Force Base, California. He was flying backseat on the mission as the instructor pilot for a flight test trainee learning the steep-descent glide technique. The pilot flying made such an approach but flared too late. The airplane struck the ground hard, the main gear failed, and the airplane caught fire. The front seat pilot of the aircraft successfully ejected upon ground impact and survived the accident, but with major injuries. By the time Lawrence ejected, the airplane had rolled onto one side and his ejection seat, with Lawrence still in it, struck the ground, killing him instantly.

Had Lawrence lived he likely would have been among the MOL astronauts who transferred to NASA after the program's cancellation, all of whom flew on the Space Shuttle.[sup][4][/sup] During his brief career, Lawrence earned the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Outstanding Unit Citation, and was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart medal. After many years of relative obscurity, on December 8, 1997, his name was inscribed on the Space Mirror Memorial at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.[sup][1][/sup]
Wow ...never heard of this guy but...


His life moved extremely fast ...sad ending to his life though...
 
4,291
366
Joined Oct 24, 2007
Originally Posted by 0cks


http://[h1]Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr.[/h1]
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation,search
[table][tr][th=""]Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr.[/th][/tr][tr][td][img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0b/Robertlawrence.jpg[/img][/td][/tr][tr][th=""]USAF Astronaut[/th][/tr][tr][th="row"]Nationality[/th][td]American[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Status[/th][td]Killed during training[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Born[/th][td]October 2, 1935(1935-10-02)
Chicago, Illinois[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Died[/th][td]December 8, 1967(1967-12-08) (aged 32)
Edwards Air Force Base, California[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Other occupation[/th][td]Test pilot[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Rank[/th][td]Major, USAF[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Time in space[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Selection[/th][td]1967 USAF MOL Group[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Missions[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][tr][th="row"]Mission insignia[/th][td]None[/td][/tr][/table]
Robert Henry Lawrence, Jr. (October 2, 1935 - December 8, 1967) was a United States Air Force officer and the first African-American astronaut.[sup][1][/sup]
[table][tr][td]
[h2]Contents[/h2]
  • 1 Early years
  • 2 Military career
  • 3 References
  • 4 External links
[/td][/tr][/table][h2][edit] Early years[/h2]
At the age of 16, he graduated in the top 10 percent from Englewood High School in Chicago. At the age of 20, he graduated from Bradley University with a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry. At Bradley, he distinguished himself as Cadet Commander in the Air Force ROTC and received the commission of Second Lieutenant in the Air Force Reserve Program.

At the age of 21 he was designated as a U.S. Air Force pilot after completing flight training at Malden Air Force Base.

At 22, he married Barbara Cress, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Henry Cress of Chicago. By the time he was 25, he had completed an Air Force assignment as an instructor pilot in the T-33 training aircraft for the German Air Force.

In 1965, Lawrence earned a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Ohio State University.[sup][2][/sup] His dissertation related to that part of chemistry which involved the conversion of tritium rays to methane gas.[sup][3][/sup]
[h2][edit] Military career[/h2]
He was a senior USAF pilot, accumulating well over 2,500 flight hours—2,000 of which were in jets. Lawrence flew many tests in the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter to investigate the gliding flight of various unpowered spacecraft returning to Earth from orbit, such as the North American X-15 rocket-plane. NASA cited Lawrence for accomplishments and flight maneuver data that "contributed greatly to the development of the Space Shuttle."[sup][1][/sup]

In June 1967, Lawrence successfully completed the Air Force Flight Test Pilot Training School at Edwards AFB, California. That same month he was selected by the USAF as an astronaut in the Air Force's Manned Orbital Laboratory (MOL) program, thus becoming the first black astronaut.

Lawrence was killed on December 8, 1967, in the crash of an F-104 Starfighter at Edwards Air Force Base, California. He was flying backseat on the mission as the instructor pilot for a flight test trainee learning the steep-descent glide technique. The pilot flying made such an approach but flared too late. The airplane struck the ground hard, the main gear failed, and the airplane caught fire. The front seat pilot of the aircraft successfully ejected upon ground impact and survived the accident, but with major injuries. By the time Lawrence ejected, the airplane had rolled onto one side and his ejection seat, with Lawrence still in it, struck the ground, killing him instantly.

Had Lawrence lived he likely would have been among the MOL astronauts who transferred to NASA after the program's cancellation, all of whom flew on the Space Shuttle.[sup][4][/sup] During his brief career, Lawrence earned the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Outstanding Unit Citation, and was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart medal. After many years of relative obscurity, on December 8, 1997, his name was inscribed on the Space Mirror Memorial at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.[sup][1][/sup]
Wow ...never heard of this guy but...


His life moved extremely fast ...sad ending to his life though...
 
776
176
Joined Sep 3, 2010
Originally Posted by Cobra Kai

SHOUTOUT TO ALL THE MEN OF ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC IN THIS THREAD. 
Originally Posted by HipHopDoc09

YEEEEESSSSSSSS!!!
^whenever this pic is posted, i always make it a fact that people also praise the aussie in this pic as well. dude went through a lot after takin a stand with his two black brothers.
MARTIN AND CO wrote:[hr][/hr]
Kid Cudi would be perfect for his biography movie. 

thread

 
776
176
Joined Sep 3, 2010
Originally Posted by Cobra Kai

SHOUTOUT TO ALL THE MEN OF ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC IN THIS THREAD. 
Originally Posted by HipHopDoc09

YEEEEESSSSSSSS!!!
^whenever this pic is posted, i always make it a fact that people also praise the aussie in this pic as well. dude went through a lot after takin a stand with his two black brothers.
MARTIN AND CO wrote:[hr][/hr]
Kid Cudi would be perfect for his biography movie. 

thread

 
9,512
521
Joined Apr 8, 2006
just wanted to show a lil love to my home:


Orange Mound, a neighborhood in southeastern Memphis, Tennessee was the first African-American neighborhood in the United States to be built by African-Americans. Orange Mound is an official suburb of South Memphis.

Built on the grounds of the former Deaderick plantation, the Orange Mound subdivision was developed for African-Americans in the 1890s to provide affordable land and residences for the less wealthy.

Drugs and crime infected the neighborhood in the 1980s and 1990s. In the first decade of the 21st century, revitalization efforts were started and show positive effects.

Geography

Orange Mound is a neighborhood bounded by Lamar Avenue in the south, Southern Avenue/Illinois Central Railroad tracks in the north, East Parkway and Airways in the west and Semmes Street in the east.
[h2] Demographics[/h2]
The neighborhood has a population of approximately 14,400 of which 95 percent are of African-American heritage.
[h2]History[/h2][h3]Deaderick plantation - 1800s[/h3]
Orange Mound stands on the site of the former John Deaderick plantation. Between 1825 and 1830, Deaderick (whose family donated the land in Nashville on which the Tennessee State Capitol was built) purchased 5,000 acres (20 km²) of land and built a stately house there (at what is now the east side of Airways, between Carnes and Spottswood). In 1890, a developer named Elzey Eugene Meachem purchased land from the Deaderick family and began developing a subdivision for African-Americans, selling lots for less than $100. In the 1890s, a typical Orange Mound house was a small, narrow "shotgun"-style house.
[h3]Vibrant black community - 1970s[/h3]
In the 1970s, Orange Mound was billed as "the largest concentration of blacks in the United States except for Harlem in New York City." The neighborhood provided a refuge for blacks moving to the city for the first time from rural areas. Although the streets of the early Orange Mound were unpaved, it was a vibrant community in which a mix of residences, businesses, churches, and cultural centers flourished. During the era of desegregation, Orange Mound entered a period of decline as younger residents began to move away.
[h3]Drugs and crime - 1980s-1990s[/h3]
Built on strong families, preachers, churches, and civic pride, this was the largest community of black homeowners in the 1940-50's. [cit needed] In the 1980s, the use of crack cocaine began separating families, generating violence, ravaging the community with crime, and breaking homes. Drug use devastated poor and middle class families. The community role models shifted away from teachers, preachers, and doctors to drug dealers and gang members. Orange Mound was listed in 1994 as the # 1 area for murders, burglaries, and rapes in Memphis. Since 1994, Orange Mound has improved considerably as crime has moved south & east.
[h3]Music[/h3]
Orange Mound hosts a growing underground rap scene as well as national hip-hop stars. Rappers 8 Ball & MJG (Premro Smith and Marlon Jermain Goodwin) grew up in Orange Mound

from wiki...
 
9,512
521
Joined Apr 8, 2006
just wanted to show a lil love to my home:


Orange Mound, a neighborhood in southeastern Memphis, Tennessee was the first African-American neighborhood in the United States to be built by African-Americans. Orange Mound is an official suburb of South Memphis.

Built on the grounds of the former Deaderick plantation, the Orange Mound subdivision was developed for African-Americans in the 1890s to provide affordable land and residences for the less wealthy.

Drugs and crime infected the neighborhood in the 1980s and 1990s. In the first decade of the 21st century, revitalization efforts were started and show positive effects.

Geography

Orange Mound is a neighborhood bounded by Lamar Avenue in the south, Southern Avenue/Illinois Central Railroad tracks in the north, East Parkway and Airways in the west and Semmes Street in the east.
[h2] Demographics[/h2]
The neighborhood has a population of approximately 14,400 of which 95 percent are of African-American heritage.
[h2]History[/h2][h3]Deaderick plantation - 1800s[/h3]
Orange Mound stands on the site of the former John Deaderick plantation. Between 1825 and 1830, Deaderick (whose family donated the land in Nashville on which the Tennessee State Capitol was built) purchased 5,000 acres (20 km²) of land and built a stately house there (at what is now the east side of Airways, between Carnes and Spottswood). In 1890, a developer named Elzey Eugene Meachem purchased land from the Deaderick family and began developing a subdivision for African-Americans, selling lots for less than $100. In the 1890s, a typical Orange Mound house was a small, narrow "shotgun"-style house.
[h3]Vibrant black community - 1970s[/h3]
In the 1970s, Orange Mound was billed as "the largest concentration of blacks in the United States except for Harlem in New York City." The neighborhood provided a refuge for blacks moving to the city for the first time from rural areas. Although the streets of the early Orange Mound were unpaved, it was a vibrant community in which a mix of residences, businesses, churches, and cultural centers flourished. During the era of desegregation, Orange Mound entered a period of decline as younger residents began to move away.
[h3]Drugs and crime - 1980s-1990s[/h3]
Built on strong families, preachers, churches, and civic pride, this was the largest community of black homeowners in the 1940-50's. [cit needed] In the 1980s, the use of crack cocaine began separating families, generating violence, ravaging the community with crime, and breaking homes. Drug use devastated poor and middle class families. The community role models shifted away from teachers, preachers, and doctors to drug dealers and gang members. Orange Mound was listed in 1994 as the # 1 area for murders, burglaries, and rapes in Memphis. Since 1994, Orange Mound has improved considerably as crime has moved south & east.
[h3]Music[/h3]
Orange Mound hosts a growing underground rap scene as well as national hip-hop stars. Rappers 8 Ball & MJG (Premro Smith and Marlon Jermain Goodwin) grew up in Orange Mound

from wiki...
 

b smooth 202

Banned
10,299
106
Joined Dec 21, 2004
Apologetic? C'mon bro. I don't have anything to be sorry for.
You're not el-hajj malik el-shabazz either. If you want to join a revolution, go to Egypt. The facts are that injustices happened. As in, PAST TENSE. Not to you and not to me.
As for your history lesson up there.. take your newly discovered revolutionary dashiki wearing #$# outta here. There are people all over the world being oppressed. Some by their own people! Are the blood diamonds not an example? Just because a man comes to your school and tells you about his situation doesn't mean that you have to jump on his wagon. It doesn't make you an expert either. It's wonderful to believe in things and help people but their race shouldn't be a factor in deciding. If it's your homeland then move back. What are you doing here? Funny-style dudes.


how do you know who I am? The real fact is those past injustices sill haven't been paid for. Look at blacks in the United States right now and they're still in the rut. The same goes for blacks and colored people across the world. Like you just said.

But because you have lived a life of material comfort your biased against the worldwide workers revolution. It's not about race. But race plays a huge role in our social consciousness and your only lying to yourself if you state otherwise. Look at the true nature of this country and we're supposed to progress, when the government isn't functioning properly it's our job to form a collective that functions to rid of them and their greedy corporations.

You can tell I hit a nerve with you. Those dashiki wearing dudes have been talking about these days for a while, and guess what? They're here! The era of crooked prosperity is over. You and I are just as capable of any politician of governing our land. Stop watching from the bench like it's out of your control....their power is derived from keeping the collective in a state of fragmentation. 

I'm not trying to make myself an expert, I can only apply my self to the situation and how I understand it.
 

b smooth 202

Banned
10,299
106
Joined Dec 21, 2004
Apologetic? C'mon bro. I don't have anything to be sorry for.
You're not el-hajj malik el-shabazz either. If you want to join a revolution, go to Egypt. The facts are that injustices happened. As in, PAST TENSE. Not to you and not to me.
As for your history lesson up there.. take your newly discovered revolutionary dashiki wearing #$# outta here. There are people all over the world being oppressed. Some by their own people! Are the blood diamonds not an example? Just because a man comes to your school and tells you about his situation doesn't mean that you have to jump on his wagon. It doesn't make you an expert either. It's wonderful to believe in things and help people but their race shouldn't be a factor in deciding. If it's your homeland then move back. What are you doing here? Funny-style dudes.


how do you know who I am? The real fact is those past injustices sill haven't been paid for. Look at blacks in the United States right now and they're still in the rut. The same goes for blacks and colored people across the world. Like you just said.

But because you have lived a life of material comfort your biased against the worldwide workers revolution. It's not about race. But race plays a huge role in our social consciousness and your only lying to yourself if you state otherwise. Look at the true nature of this country and we're supposed to progress, when the government isn't functioning properly it's our job to form a collective that functions to rid of them and their greedy corporations.

You can tell I hit a nerve with you. Those dashiki wearing dudes have been talking about these days for a while, and guess what? They're here! The era of crooked prosperity is over. You and I are just as capable of any politician of governing our land. Stop watching from the bench like it's out of your control....their power is derived from keeping the collective in a state of fragmentation. 

I'm not trying to make myself an expert, I can only apply my self to the situation and how I understand it.
 

antonlavey

Banned
28,265
862
Joined Oct 13, 2008
Originally Posted by cmoneymontana

Films you should see:






this isn't African American cinema but this is literally one of the greatest movie performances of all time. My Ghanian friend in college and I used to have Shaka Zulu nights were we just chilled and watched this movie




your thirst for revenge has been quenched a thousand times over......dude proceeds to impale mad people
 

antonlavey

Banned
28,265
862
Joined Oct 13, 2008
Originally Posted by cmoneymontana

Films you should see:






this isn't African American cinema but this is literally one of the greatest movie performances of all time. My Ghanian friend in college and I used to have Shaka Zulu nights were we just chilled and watched this movie




your thirst for revenge has been quenched a thousand times over......dude proceeds to impale mad people
 

lobotomybeats

Supporter
8,866
16,109
Joined Jan 8, 2004
"Black History Month should be called "Four Weeks Of Morgan Freeman's Voiceover Work"-Jenny Johnson
 

lobotomybeats

Supporter
8,866
16,109
Joined Jan 8, 2004
"Black History Month should be called "Four Weeks Of Morgan Freeman's Voiceover Work"-Jenny Johnson
 
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