Dev Bootcamp / CodeStreak / App Academy... and other Code-Immersion programs - Any of ya'll take one

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Saw a special on this a few months ago...got me thinking about applying...does this stuff really work? I went to college, did the whole 4 year degree thing and can't say I really use any of what I learned. I need a new skill cuz 'business' just ain't cuttin it anymore. Immersion programs just seem to make so much more sense...day in day out doing the same thing.

http://devbootcamp.com/


What's the difference between this and something like ITT or Kaplan? Anyone know someone who's taken something like this? Anyone applied? There are very few reviews online...
 
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i have dabbled in writing code.. it's not easy as you probably know, but the site i was using was codeacademy.com

definitely worthwhile if you put your time in and work on it.
 
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Cool thread. I would appreciate any other bootcamps or online trainings for coding that are recommended.

CE, CS and IT degrees are pointless in MY OPINION. You need real world experience.
 
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coursera.org looks pretty cool, too.

i just haven't had much luck with online learning...there isn't always a clear goal and there isn't always someone to talk to about it.

for the most part, though, i was wondering if anyone had any experience with these bootcamps and what they thought of them...someone here has to have been to one...
 
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not sure if anyone is still following this thread, but if they are, i interviewed at two Dev bootcamps and decided to go with CodingDojo.co

In all honesty, the one for codingdojo sounds more like training for a recruitment placement service than a bootcamp, but I'm ok with that. I prefer that at this point. the other one I checked out, CatalystClass, was a bit further along that I felt comfortable with.

if anyone has any interest in learning about the progress, chime in and I'll update this thread as things go along.
 
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I'm not sure anyone cares, but I just finished week two and this is what has been covered thus far:

Domain hosting & server space
HTML
CSS & Twitter Bootstrap
jQuery
Intro to PHP
 
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thank you for posting this. I already have a nice amount of knowledge but it needs some polishing and this will help.
 
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thank you for posting this. I already have a nice amount of knowledge but it needs some polishing and this will help.

yep. I hope to post something every 2 weeks or so until it's finished...hopefully i have a couple of nice projects to show at then of it too
 
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Highly recommend codecademy.com to start, for those in NYC they have great 12 week courses at General Assembly. Well worth the money I hear. Also there are tons of free guides out there for learning Ruby on Rails if you guys want to dive into web development.
 

jhawk826

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Codeacademy is good, but unless you're one of those people that can learn by yourself you'll be in a bit of trouble. I wasn't an IT/CS major, so I had some trouble learning how to do code by myself. If I had an instructor go through it with me, I would have had a much easier time. I already know HTML for the most part due to dabbling in Wordpress and ModX.
 
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Continuation of my previous post...I just finished week four and this is what we've covered since week two:

MySQL, ERDs & MySQL Workbench
Advanced PHP
OOP
AJAX
MVC's

I wasn't fast enough to get into the OOP, AJAX nor MVC stuff yet, but I was able to make my way through PHP. I can't believe I've only been working on this stuff for 4 weeks and I've already built multi-page sites similar to FB in PHP.

I've got 2 days to study up on OOP, AJAX and MVC before we begin our first project next wednesday. Not much time but I should be able to start my project without it.

If any of ya'll are looking to code - a program like this might be the answer...
 
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Continuation of my previous post...I just finished week four and this is what we've covered since week two:

MySQL, ERDs & MySQL Workbench
Advanced PHP
OOP
AJAX
MVC's

I wasn't fast enough to get into the OOP, AJAX nor MVC stuff yet, but I was able to make my way through PHP. I can't believe I've only been working on this stuff for 4 weeks and I've already built multi-page sites similar to FB in PHP.

I've got 2 days to study up on OOP, AJAX and MVC before we begin our first project next wednesday. Not much time but I should be able to start my project without it.

If any of ya'll are looking to code - a program like this might be the answer...

How much is the boot amp your in. I've tried codecademy but kinda stopped after a while. I think I'd prefer a class like setting.
 
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How much is the boot amp your in. I've tried codecademy but kinda stopped after a while. I think I'd prefer a class like setting.

it's $5k this time around but they've upped the next class' tuition to $7.5k

it may sound like a lot, but a lot of these programs have relationships with companies that hire directly through the program itself...if you get a job through the program, they may refund a portion (or, in our case, 100%) of your tuition fees.

i find it very difficult to find the motivation to learn on my own. being in a class like setting with hours dedicated solely to studying, i get a lot more done.
 
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Cool thread. I would appreciate any other bootcamps or online trainings for coding that are recommended.

CE, CS and IT degrees are pointless in MY OPINION. You need real world experience.

I wouldnt go so far as to say that CE, CS, and IT degrees are pointless. Having the educational background in this area can be quite helpful. With that said with those degrees, as you stated, you need alot of hands on experience to be trully effective.
 
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I wouldnt go so far as to say that CE, CS, and IT degrees are pointless. Having the educational background in this area can be quite helpful. With that said with those degrees, as you stated, you need alot of hands on experience to be trully effective.

The point of the degree (believe it or not) is not to learn things. It's to prove you can learn things :smile: Unless you're a programming god and can prove it, a degree is usually the way to go. You can get programming experience (and get paid pretty damn well) while in school. A few of my friends work part-time internships, and they make ~$2000 a month. Top tech companies pay interns salaries higher than most of the country. My summer internship (full time) is about $6k per month. Not bad for a student.

However, I (mostly) agree that a degree is pretty much a pretty piece of paper. 85% of what I've learned, I've learned outside of class. You need work experience and outside of school projects. I've worked with tons of people in my class who get by with just the bare minimum. You can tell who these people are, and I kinda worry about them finding jobs (God forbid they somehow become embedded systems devs).

Learning to code is not a terribly difficult task. Learning to code well is bound to kick your ***. Is coding something your interested in? Does web development appeal to you at all. Pick up a book or two, or check out some online tutorials. I personally know 5 people (who I worked with on teams) who've dropped out of the major. Know where you stand.

For anyone who cares:

I'd be wary about spending that much money. $12,200 for 9 weeks seems a little excessive. The overview of what they cover looks decent enough. However, it's really the minimum you need. Pretty much any book on HTML and CSS will give you sufficient knowledge to use them (they aren't terribly difficult, either). Git is easily learned if you have the most basic grasp of Unix. The same goes for the other tools/languages/methodologies: they come with experience. To me, a good book about a subject is worth it's weight in gold. I find it best when I can learn at my own pace. What we cover in 3 weeks of lectures, I can easily cover within 3 or 4 days of focused studying using a good book.

However, if mentorship and the class room setting are important to you, it might be worth it. If you find it hard to stay focused on something, or if you like procrastinating, this might seem like a good deal for you. I know quite a few people like this. They need organization, structure, and support to learn. If you need that, go for it. However, keep in mind that every field of programming is changing. You'll eventually need to learn new technologies, or new languages. In time, you'll learn to work things out and learn by yourself. If this type of 'bootcamp' will push you in that direction, then it would be worth every penny.

However, I still think every programmer should have a decent grounding in the principles of the field. Web programmers tend to float high above the low level details of computers and operating systems, but you should know how they work. After all, you want to be versatile. It'll make finding jobs easier, and you'll be more marketable. I for one don't hate web programming, but I can tolerate it enough such that I have a decent grasp of it. The more tools and frameworks you end up learning, the better.

I could probably distill the basics my CS career into 6 (or 7) great books:

Code Complete, Steve Mcconnell
The Pragmatic Programmer, Hunt and Thomas
The C Programming Language, K&R (and Bjarne's C++ book too )
Algorithms, Sedgewick
Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Sipser
Modern Operating Systems, Tennenbaum

Of course, the majority of the learning is in applying this stuff. Outside of this'basic' knowledge, you will need more and more specific knowledge. I've got a stack of books taller than I am about game programming. Even more about specific languages. There are always best practices and things that you end up needing to know, no matter what your concentration is (design patterns, for example).



Of what you've posted so far, it seems like a good opportunity. In 9 weeks, you're not going to be an expert in the subjects, but I think that it should give you a good base. Pick a few subjects you like and go more in-depth. It will show any employers that may be watching that you care, and anything you do to stand out helps. After a while, start developing a portfolio, and create a Github account. And if you ever buy a book, remember to do the exercises. They help :smile:
 
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:lol: i had no idea there was a codeacademy thread on NT. halfway done with the python course. its not 100% tho, the interpreter utilizes slightly diff syntax than the latest version of python...running it via official python interpreter gives me errors i don't get on the site.

repped OP :pimp:
 
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The point of the degree (believe it or not) is not to learn things. It's to prove you can learn things :smile: Unless you're a programming god and can prove it, a degree is usually the way to go. You can get programming experience (and get paid pretty damn well) while in school. A few of my friends work part-time internships, and they make ~$2000 a month. Top tech companies pay interns salaries higher than most of the country. My summer internship (full time) is about $6k per month. Not bad for a student.

However, I (mostly) agree that a degree is pretty much a pretty piece of paper. 85% of what I've learned, I've learned outside of class. You need work experience and outside of school projects. I've worked with tons of people in my class who get by with just the bare minimum. You can tell who these people are, and I kinda worry about them finding jobs (God forbid they somehow become embedded systems devs).

Learning to code is not a terribly difficult task. Learning to code well is bound to kick your ***. Is coding something your interested in? Does web development appeal to you at all. Pick up a book or two, or check out some online tutorials. I personally know 5 people (who I worked with on teams) who've dropped out of the major. Know where you stand.

For anyone who cares:

I'd be wary about spending that much money. $12,200 for 9 weeks seems a little excessive. The overview of what they cover looks decent enough. However, it's really the minimum you need. Pretty much any book on HTML and CSS will give you sufficient knowledge to use them (they aren't terribly difficult, either). Git is easily learned if you have the most basic grasp of Unix. The same goes for the other tools/languages/methodologies: they come with experience. To me, a good book about a subject is worth it's weight in gold. I find it best when I can learn at my own pace. What we cover in 3 weeks of lectures, I can easily cover within 3 or 4 days of focused studying using a good book.

However, if mentorship and the class room setting are important to you, it might be worth it. If you find it hard to stay focused on something, or if you like procrastinating, this might seem like a good deal for you. I know quite a few people like this. They need organization, structure, and support to learn. If you need that, go for it. However, keep in mind that every field of programming is changing. You'll eventually need to learn new technologies, or new languages. In time, you'll learn to work things out and learn by yourself. If this type of 'bootcamp' will push you in that direction, then it would be worth every penny.

However, I still think every programmer should have a decent grounding in the principles of the field. Web programmers tend to float high above the low level details of computers and operating systems, but you should know how they work. After all, you want to be versatile. It'll make finding jobs easier, and you'll be more marketable. I for one don't hate web programming, but I can tolerate it enough such that I have a decent grasp of it. The more tools and frameworks you end up learning, the better.

I could probably distill the basics my CS career into 6 (or 7) great books:

Code Complete, Steve Mcconnell
The Pragmatic Programmer, Hunt and Thomas
The C Programming Language, K&R (and Bjarne's C++ book too )
Algorithms, Sedgewick
Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Sipser
Modern Operating Systems, Tennenbaum

Of course, the majority of the learning is in applying this stuff. Outside of this'basic' knowledge, you will need more and more specific knowledge. I've got a stack of books taller than I am about game programming. Even more about specific languages. There are always best practices and things that you end up needing to know, no matter what your concentration is (design patterns, for example).



Of what you've posted so far, it seems like a good opportunity. In 9 weeks, you're not going to be an expert in the subjects, but I think that it should give you a good base. Pick a few subjects you like and go more in-depth. It will show any employers that may be watching that you care, and anything you do to stand out helps. After a while, start developing a portfolio, and create a Github account. And if you ever buy a book, remember to do the exercises. They help :smile:

This is a good post, thanks for the info. I will be checking out a couple of those books.

If you think $12.2k is a lot, there's another one out there charging $17.5k...I've looked into a few of these, and the one I chose was by far the cheapest.

But I think you're right in the majority of your argument - this dev bootcamp will not be getting me any more than probably an entry level job as a Junior Developer (which is more or less what I wanted).

Where did you intern btw?
 
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This is a good post, thanks for the info. I will be checking out a couple of those books.

If you think $12.2k is a lot, there's another one out there charging $17.5k...I've looked into a few of these, and the one I chose was by far the cheapest.

But I think you're right in the majority of your argument - this dev bootcamp will not be getting me any more than probably an entry level job as a Junior Developer (which is more or less what I wanted).

Where did you intern btw?

As long as you can get your foot in the door. A junior developer is still a developer. The more experience you get, the less having a degree will matter. Lots of guys start off as quality assurance or testers, but they program in their free time. Eventually they become full time developers because that opportunity is close by. All you need to do is show them you're capable.

Programming is a special field in that way. You can get by on pure talent and hard work. You really don't need a degree. Other fields, like mechanical engineering, civil engineering, medicine, or law pretty much require you to have a degree, because without it, you're a liability. It's probably to do with how every other field needs raw resources and special training. All you need to be a programmer is a computer and some dedication. Fred Brooks says it better than I can:

http://people.apache.org/~acmurthy/WhyIsProgrammingFun.html


Once you find your first job, you should be set. Be sure to do some projects in your free time. I can't tell you how helpful that is. I have to say I'm not the greatest student, but having some sort of portfolio is important. Out of the 7 internships I applied to, I got 5 offers. I have no previous internships, relevant work experience ,etc on my resume, but I spend almost all of my free time working on programming projects, and I made sure to link to it in my application. It gives you something to talk about during interviews, and it shows you... 'care', for lack of a better word.

However, if you haven't covered data structures, algorithms, design patterns, and time complexities, be sure to spend time learning them in your free time. As a general rule, any programming job you apply for will have an 'interview' process, in which they pretty much interrogate you to make sure you know about those subjects I mentioned. Even if you 'luck out' and find somewhere that won't ask you these types of questions, it will still help you become a better programmer. Those sorts of topics are pretty much required knowledge for any kind of programming.

I'm interning with Amazon in the summer. The interview process was a *****, but it's one of the highest paying tech internships. You even get an employee discount of 10% off at Amazon.com. I would do the internship just for the discount, but don't tell them that :lol:

My only regret is not starting to program earlier. It hasn't even been 2 years since I switched into computer science, and I can't see myself doing anything else.

was going to ask about software engineering and how i can get my foot in the door, but you gave mad info already. a portfolio sounds like a great idea (where do you store stuff like that? google cloud? github?)

im an EE with limited programming exp. essentially i took C, Verilog, Assembly and did MATLAB in school thats all. Currently studying Python on my own.

would a masters in comp sci help me out in switching careers? or should i just gring on my own, step up my language game and ride with my EE degree?

for ref, im in the architectual and engineering business. Its a start, but not interesting/what i want to do, so looking to make moves soon.

:nerd: :nerd:
 
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Posting for later to check out all this stuff.

I always wanted to learn to write code but just never knew where to start. I already have my 4 year degree in business just want to learn for future reference
 
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Sorry guys -

update for the past two weeks:

OOP, MVC for the first week. This past week we just completed our first project. I built a very simple translation application for English dialects. It's got a few bugs and could use a bit of attention, but overall I'm happy that I was able to complete it.

Just started Ruby today...will let you know how it goes.
 
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