***Official Political Discussion Thread***

5,838
13,860
Joined Jun 28, 2004
People who defend the electoral college (and by extension the Senate) always point that; if we had a popular vote and/or a legislature with both chambers being proportional to population, then “California and New York” or “a few big cities” would dominate national politics.

Putting aside the obvious dog whistling implicit in those arguments, those arguments also ignore the role of money in politics. The billionaire class dominates our politics and as these tweets point out, most of them do not reside in the “heartland.”

If you’re a worker in a red State and you think the Senate and EC helps you, look at Joe Manchin or any Republican Senate. Those people have few, if any billionaires, as their de jure constituents. At the same time, Musk, Bezos, Gates, Zuckerberg, and all most of the other wealth people in Silicon Valley, Wall Street and Hollywood, own “your” Senator.

If you’re a Republican, who is not wealthy, and you say, with pride, that Manchin’s ability to sabotage or Trump being President with fewer votes, are examples of the constitutional order working as the Founder intended, you are correct, just not in the way you think.
 
10,836
7,782
Joined Oct 14, 2008
The fact that we couldn’t get a corporate tax hike is baffling to me. Granted I don’t want to do all that consulting work I had to do after TCJA.
 
11,341
27,441
Joined Jan 16, 2011
It's a symbolism some companies are all too ready to capitalize on. A number of top-ranked law firms now issue branded Patagonia vests as part of the swag packages that typically accompany job offers.

And it's not a decision entirely based in trend awareness. Patagonia is a company well-regarded for its environmentalist ethos. It was co-founded by the acclaimed rock-climber Yvon Chouinard, and as of October 2017, commits 10 percent of its profits to environmental causes. "The firm gets brownie points for that. They can say, 'Look, we selected a company that has CSR on its mind,'" Frank said, referring to the HR-speak acronym for corporate social responsibility.

But when I contacted Patagonia to inquire as to their marketing relationship with the financial sector, the response I received was less than enthusiastic. In a rather terse email from the communications team, I was told they have "no idea" how or why the vests became so popular with the young corporate set—they build their products specifically for "environmentalists and laborers who work in the elements."
The timeline was definitely altered. Patagonia is out there issuing Tommy-Hilfigeresque cease-and-desist letters to the finance bros.
 

TooOlfForThisIsh

Supporter
418
1,029
Joined Sep 28, 2020
The timeline was definitely altered. Patagonia is out there issuing Tommy-Hilfigeresque cease-and-desist letters to the finance bros.
True. I find iPatagonia’s pushback pretty amusing. But you’d never catch me In a trader vest which somehow manages to be douchier than the classic blu shirt / white collar banker look of the 80’s.

Not that anyone cares, but I’m pretty sure the former is a reaction to the latter: the rough edged boys from Jersey and Long Island snubbing their nose at the prep school elite on the other side of the firm… all facilitated by the fact that traders don’t have clients, they have counterparties.

But rusty’s grandma definitely had something there…
 

yobyellav

formerly cord15
8,478
6,192
Joined Sep 12, 2006
I didn't find Dave's latest special any different than his other ones.
Republicans couldn't have hoped for any better than Sinema and Manchin.
A lot of Americans are gonna be ****ed if it goes the way it's looking like it will.
 

RustyShackleford

Supporter
51,281
141,353
Joined Jul 20, 2009
The fact that we couldn’t get a corporate tax hike is baffling to me. Granted I don’t want to do all that consulting work I had to do after TCJA.
Sinema unilaterally killed it. Biden begged her for weeks and she didn't budge.

Mitch been bragging since last year that Sinema promised him she would never voter for one. He has been encouraging Republicans to praise her publicly and privately to feed her ego

Nasty stuff
 
2,270
2,702
Joined Feb 21, 2006

We're sitting here and joking about these clowns every day, but it looks like they're winning to me.


You're not crazy to think that way.

All the stuff that's been happening here sounds so far from reality if you're not used to follow the politics of unstable societies. If you are attuned to the political realities of regions like West/Central/Eastern Africa, Eastern Europe, or the Middle East, a lot of what is happening in the States feels familiar and scary.

When people who are unwilling to compromise take hold of the levers of power, the conclusion you're thinking about is usually the end result, especially when the general public is mostly indifferent to the internal politics of their society (as is the case in the US) or unable to exercise political power (pick your favorite dictatorship).

This is why I've been very pessimistic about the future of the US as a single country ever since Trump not only got elected, but beat two impeachments on clearly partisan votes. Part of me wants to believe that things will get better, and I live my life as if things will get better without getting too bad, but I'm also mentally preparing myself to bounce if **** hits the fan like the worsening socioeconomic situation indicate they will.
Another iteration of American Exceptionalism, basically? I think you’re right.
 
2,270
2,702
Joined Feb 21, 2006
Kinda wild any voting awareness or voting protection is looked at as partisan because Republicans are so hell bent on sabotaging it and making it as hard as possible it became their identity.
Indeed. On a small level, I was involved in the civic engagement task force at my school last year, and we had various events and channels of communication to promote voter registration and turnout leading up to the election. We literally had conservative faculty members and students question why we would do this and actually file complaints that this was partisan activity.
 
5,838
13,860
Joined Jun 28, 2004

Assuming that Youngkin isn’t totally full of it and means what he’s saying, he’s an example of the lumpen bourgeoisie.

While the very wealthy have never been more homogeneous in their aesthetic preferences and they still tend to cling to certain shared class projects like low taxes and low wages, many of the rich have lost a sense of a general interest of capital.

The lumpen bourgeoisie tend to cluster among regional elites outside of major cities and they tend to have fortunes related to construction, owning and renting out properties, agriculture, mineral extraction, and really any industry other than tech or finance or entertainment. Although as we see, there are some lumpen bourgeoisie in those fields as well.

Opposition to a higher minimum wage, fighting climate change, and social spending (unless that social spending directly helps their business, Medicare and nursing home ownership and fraud are dominated by the lumpen bourgeoisie) define the lumpen bourgeoisie. In fact, opposition to policies that ultimately benefit capitalism generally define this class.

Sure, a healthy biome will help capitalism in the long run but oil and coal barons would lose out. Universal healthcare and paid leave and tuition free college yields a happier, healthier and ultimately more productive work force and makes life easier for genuinely innovative startups but there are capitalists who want maximum leverage over their workers to accept low wages and bad working conditions.

Infrastructure and affordable housing follow a similar logic. Better infrastructure would allow a businesses to have better internet connection, have faster delivery times, and get better employee skills matches due to shorter commute times. But some rich people refuse to pay higher taxes. Affordable housing is needed in the worse way, setting aside humanitarian reasons, affordable housing facilitates better labor matching and it lets employers effectively pay their employees more with the same payroll costs. Landlords, obviously, oppose affordable housing.

While economic special interest drive most of the lumpen bourgeoisie’s behavior, do not underestimate cultural preferences. At one time, conservative media was one two tracks, one for the less educated and lower income bigots and then more elite publications for rich and well educated bigots. The rhubs could content themselves with mega churches and faux populist rants about politicians being “soft in on crime.” Meanwhile, the very wealthy and credentialed conservative could read William F. Buckley’s take on why Thucydides would have been in favor of Volcker’s decision to raise interest rates. Through a process started by Fox News and finished by Donald Trump, we got millionaires and billionaires genuinely liking the same QAnon crap as much as any hick with a MAGA hat would.

Every business owner should want a universal vaccine mandate both because it would stimulate the economy by meaningfully stopping the virus and it takes the matter out if employers’ hands, thus helping with employee retention. But some business owners, including some very wealthy business owners, with much to lose, oppose it on grounds that MTG said it was an attempt, by George Soros, to put tracking chips in everybody.

Culture war works the same way. Businesses, with a large customer base or a potentially large customer base, want to sell to everybody. A rational capitalist, who wants to get every person on Earth to buy their stuff shouldn't want to have to take sides in these culture wars that Trump and the GOP dream up. But there’s some capitalists, who love these culture wars and want more of them.

Ultimately, I don’t care what’s good for capitalism but I still retain a bit of the spirit of a remorseless Yankee merchant. I’m looking at the BBB and I’m thinking that most of this is so good for business, in general, and yet each provision gets shot down by a small segment of the capitalist class, that damned lumpen bourgeoisie.

We are truly in the second guided age. Not just because of appealing levels of wealth and income inequality and not just due to declining life expectancy and not just because of a rollback of hard won civil rights victories achieved in the seventh decade of the proceeding century, but because the bourgeoisie itself has no plan for the future or for its general interests.

Sadly, the bourgeoisie, as a class, can suffer its lumpen members because it can consistently avail itself of free money from the state and it can resolve intra class contradictions by taking more and more from workers. Not only has the bourgeoisie plundered workers for too long, it offloads all of its internal dysfunction onto workers. It’s time for the working class to resist with a spirit of solidarity that its bourgeois rivals have lost.
 

Mark Antony

Supporter
55,229
73,095
Joined Apr 30, 2010

Assuming that Youngkin isn’t totally full of it and means what he’s saying, he’s an example of the lumpen bourgeoisie.

While the very wealthy have never been more homogeneous in their aesthetic preferences and they still tend to cling to certain shared class projects like low taxes and low wages, many of the rich have lost a sense of a general interest of capital.

The lumpen bourgeoisie tend to cluster among regional elites outside of major cities and they tend to have fortunes related to construction, owning and renting out properties, agriculture, mineral extraction, and really any industry other than tech or finance or entertainment. Although as we see, there are some lumpen bourgeoisie in those fields as well.

Opposition to a higher minimum wage, fighting climate change, and social spending (unless that social spending directly helps their business, Medicare and nursing home ownership and fraud are dominated by the lumpen bourgeoisie) define the lumpen bourgeoisie. In fact, opposition to policies that ultimately benefit capitalism generally define this class.

Sure, a healthy biome will help capitalism in the long run but oil and coal barons would lose out. Universal healthcare and paid leave and tuition free college yields a happier, healthier and ultimately more productive work force and makes life easier for genuinely innovative startups but there are capitalists who want maximum leverage over their workers to accept low wages and bad working conditions.

Infrastructure and affordable housing follow a similar logic. Better infrastructure would allow a businesses to have better internet connection, have faster delivery times, and get better employee skills matches due to shorter commute times. But some rich people refuse to pay higher taxes. Affordable housing is needed in the worse way, setting aside humanitarian reasons, affordable housing facilitates better labor matching and it lets employers effectively pay their employees more with the same payroll costs. Landlords, obviously, oppose affordable housing.

While economic special interest drive most of the lumpen bourgeoisie’s behavior, do not underestimate cultural preferences. At one time, conservative media was one two tracks, one for the less educated and lower income bigots and then more elite publications for rich and well educated bigots. The rhubs could content themselves with mega churches and faux populist rants about politicians being “soft in on crime.” Meanwhile, the very wealthy and credentialed conservative could read William F. Buckley’s take on why Thucydides would have been in favor of Volcker’s decision to raise interest rates. Through a process started by Fox News and finished by Donald Trump, we got millionaires and billionaires genuinely liking the same QAnon crap as much as any hick with a MAGA hat would.

Every business owner should want a universal vaccine mandate both because it would stimulate the economy by meaningfully stopping the virus and it takes the matter out if employers’ hands, thus helping with employee retention. But some business owners, including some very wealthy business owners, with much to lose, oppose it on grounds that MTG said it was an attempt, by George Soros, to put tracking chips in everybody.

Culture war works the same way. Businesses, with a large customer base or a potentially large customer base, want to sell to everybody. A rational capitalist, who wants to get every person on Earth to buy their stuff shouldn't want to have to take sides in these culture wars that Trump and the GOP dream up. But there’s some capitalists, who love these culture wars and want more of them.

Ultimately, I don’t care what’s good for capitalism but I still retain a bit of the spirit of a remorseless Yankee merchant. I’m looking at the BBB and I’m thinking that most of this is so good for business, in general, and yet each provision gets shot down by a small segment of the capitalist class, that damned lumpen bourgeoisie.

We are truly in the second guided age. Not just because of appealing levels of wealth and income inequality and not just due to declining life expectancy and not just because of a rollback of hard won civil rights victories achieved in the seventh decade of the proceeding century, but because the bourgeoisie itself has no plan for the future or for its general interests.

Sadly, the bourgeoisie, as a class, can suffer its lumpen members because it can consistently avail itself of free money from the state and it can resolve intra class contradictions by taking more and more from workers. Not only has the bourgeoisie plundered workers for too long, it offloads all of its internal dysfunction onto workers. It’s time for the working class to resist with a spirit of solidarity that its bourgeois rivals have lost.
Damn I thought he was one of the people, he wears vests.
 
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