Official Programming & Development Thread Vol. ASP.NET, C/C#/C++, HTML, Java, Etc.

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Joined Sep 12, 2014
I'm more interested in the design aspects

Webdesign, app development etc

Not so much the coding/programming and the engineering behind it.

So UI/UX

Is learning to code a resource to pursue this career path?

I'm more interested in creative type jobs

is this field suited for me?
 
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6,589
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Joined May 22, 2008
Nice article...it mentions Udemy and Code Academy. Udemy is awesome but expensive, most good classes are $199 BUT they often have sales. I got 5 courses for $15 apiece. I'll let y'all know when the n xt sale happens. Rob Percival's iOS, Android, and Web development courses might just be the best you can find on the Internet. He even sets you up with a year free web hosting with unlimited storage. In his iOS app dev course he's having us build a true clone of Instagram, Tinder, and Uber so that we know how to build an enterprise level app. I just started but within the first hour We're already building apps.

Here's the article BTW
 
6,589
2,163
Joined May 22, 2008
I'm more interested in the design aspects

Webdesign, app development etc

Not so much the coding/programming and the engineering behind it.

So UI/UX

Is learning to code a resource to pursue this career path?

I'm more interested in creative type jobs

is this field suited for me?
https://www.udemy.com/the-complete-design-course/

Check that link out. This summer when I interned at ExxonMobil I.T. we had a user centered design class we attended. It was some technical stuff but it was more design and customer focused. A lot of prototyping and revisions before even trying to build anything. You'd have to be familiar with at least a basic level of coding,
 

Top Boy

formerly jay patt
8,409
5,613
Joined Feb 5, 2013
 


I need a new career path

Is it too late to get on this wave?
Like Yeah mentioned there are different trains of thought regarding coding and learning to. I started out with Java and it seemed to make all the other Object based languages easier to understand.
Facts.

Started off learning Java as well and it's made transitioning into other languages almost effortless.
 
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Joined Dec 12, 2012
These are some of the "curricula" I'm using as a guidance for concepts to learn.

https://github.com/mvillaloboz/open-source-cs-degree - Provides classes you should take to learn Computer Science and links to top tier universities that offer open courseware for those classes. I mostly use this one for reference.

https://github.com/open-source-society/computer-science  - Same thing, but a lot more classes.

https://www.google.com/about/careers/students/guide-to-technical-development.html  - Google's guide to learning Computer Science.
 
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Is anyone in here learning or doing programming/development for future profit opportunities but not necessarily to work for a company in here? Let's talk. I guess maybe if I was looking to get a job in the field I'd be more focused on mastering one area, but as it is now I'm learning coding first for app dev, then getting familiar with Linux so that I can get into the whole Kali penetration testing/ethical hacker world, then getting setting up a home Cisco lab to practice for my CCNA.
 
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17,310
2,412
Joined Mar 14, 2006
I'm more interested in the design aspects

Webdesign, app development etc

Not so much the coding/programming and the engineering behind it.

So UI/UX

Is learning to code a resource to pursue this career path?

I'm more interested in creative type jobs

is this field suited for me?
Yea, there are different styles of coding whether you want to do front-end, back-end, full stack or even web design. UI/UX is actually a "niche" job where companies look for people that specifically focus on that.

You'll have to learn some type of coding, whether it's basic HTML/CSS or Bootstrapp (Less and Sass included) along w/ the Adobe creative suites.
 
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Joined May 22, 2008
https://www.groupon.com/deals/udemy-11-houston

^^^ Might be the smartest $100 you could spend.
All these courses listed below
C++ Fundamentals Part I and Part II by Paul Deitel
Beginners Ruby Programming Training by Infinite Skills
HTML and CSS for Beginners! by Mark Lassoff
Learn Python, it’s CAKE (Beginners) by Jason Elbourne
Learning MySQL5 — An Easy Way to Master MySQL by Infinite Skills
PHP Punch in the Face by Orlando FL Jesse Boyer
AJAX Development by Mark Lassoff
JavaScript Basics: Parts I and II by Paul Deitel
Servlets and JSPs: Creating Web Applications with Java by John Purcell
Coding for Entrepreneurs by Justin Mitchel

Sure you could cobble together all this info on the net, but the way Udemy packages their courses which inlcudes quizzes, projects, and challenges makes for a more cohesive learning experience IMO. But then again that's my opinion, everyone might not feel the same way and that's very understandable.
 
6,589
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Joined May 22, 2008
Guys who are just getting into programming listen up.


There is no right or wrong way to learn, it all depends on your learning style. For example: You'll hear more experienced programmers say that you need to figure everything out on your own....but it makes no sense wasting too much time searching for something if you're not even understanding what you're searching for. In these cases it's better to ask a knowledgeable person directly OR find examples of already completed code similar to what you might use and then study the composition and components of the example code until you understand it.

Example say I wanted to write code that could determine if a given or chosen number is a prime number. Now of course I'd at least try to figure as much of it out on my own as possible at first. So I'm like I'd need at least one "if" statement and since we're talking about numbers that don't divide into another number without a remainder (prime) then I would guess I'd need to use a Modulo (%) somewhere in that code. That's the "logic" behind it but maybe I can't quite figure out the exact syntax to make that happen. So instead of wasting too much valuable time and getting all frustrated (which is counter-productive to learning BTW) I'll do a quick Google search to give me a helping hand. After a search this is what one of the results is...

var number = 57

var isPrime = true
for var i = 2; i
 
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Joined Feb 18, 2014
Nice article...it mentions Udemy and Code Academy. Udemy is awesome but expensive, most good classes are $199 BUT they often have sales. I got 5 courses for $15 apiece. I'll let y'all know when the n xt sale happens. Rob Percival's iOS, Android, and Web development courses might just be the best you can find on the Internet. He even sets you up with a year free web hosting with unlimited storage. In his iOS app dev course he's having us build a true clone of Instagram, Tinder, and Uber so that we know how to build an enterprise level app. I just started but within the first hour We're already building apps.

Here's the article BTW
too bad i can only give 1 rep for this.
 
4,758
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Joined Nov 6, 2012
Good stuff on making this thread yeah yeah :pimp:

No sig on mobile.
Software engineer,
Languages : C, C++, Java, C# , bash

I agree with starting out with Java. Once you get java down and programming principles/algorithms down pact you can apply what you learned to any language.

Once the light bulb goes off and coding starts to become effortless for you is when you know all of your hard work has paid off.

One day it just finally clicked for me. Always ask for help and an explanation, don't try to learn with no help. It will take you forever to understand the most simple concepts.
 
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3,969
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Joined Feb 8, 2011
For each person trying to learn how to code
If (person.iq > 88) THEN
If (person.patient) THEN
person.progammingability = "possible"
patience is probably my weak point in which I have to work on mostly. How much time do you guys thats still in the process of obtaining a degree or CCNA invest into programming, network, database or whatever it may be? I feel like I'm exhausted from school and 2 jobs so when I get home I rarely do any extra studying or reading. Basically, its not my passion I just want the money but I'm now in my senior year of college taking all major related classes.
 
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patience is probably my weak point in which I have to work on mostly. How much time do you guys thats still in the process of obtaining a degree or CCNA invest into programming, network, database or whatever it may be? I feel like I'm exhausted from school and 2 jobs so when I get home I rarely do any extra studying or reading. Basically, its not my passion I just want the money but I'm now in my senior year of college taking all major related classes.
What are you majoring in? Why not minor in CS? Why are you working two jobs and not an internship? If you're in a decently major city a tech internship will probably pay more than your two jobs. When I went to college I actually kind of stay still on certain skills but u coursework had programming in it. My upper level years of undergrad I was working in the industry already and you will always fine ways to program. Automation requires programming even something like macros are useful and help keep you're minding thinking like a programmer.
 
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For those interested in a career in finance or something data oriented, I'd recommend taking a few classes in R / SQL / Python.
 
3,969
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Joined Feb 8, 2011
What are you majoring in? Why not minor in CS? Why are you working two jobs and not an internship? If you're in a decently major city a tech internship will probably pay more than your two jobs. When I went to college I actually kind of stay still on certain skills but u coursework had programming in it. My upper level years of undergrad I was working in the industry already and you will always fine ways to program. Automation requires programming even something like macros are useful and help keep you're minding thinking like a programmer.
Im majoring in information technology with a concentration of Network and Security, I was originally a CS major but was intimidated by the math that comes with it. I had a car expense that I had to take care of also so I was working full-time. I then switched to a part time job to become full time in college but still needed a bit more income in order to satisfy my expenses. I then accepted a school job which helps me, now my part-time job wants to give me full-time hours starting Summer. My courses vary, regarding coding, I will only code maybe in one or two of my classes per semester. My classes currently involves learning about database, a foundations of network security class & lab, a human computer interactions course, and a quality testing and assurance course so not too much coding going on this semester I believe. I haven't taken up any internships because the ones currently offered are unpaid internships and irrelevant to my field.
 
17,310
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Joined Mar 14, 2006
For those interested in a career in finance or something data oriented, I'd recommend taking a few classes in R / SQL / Python.
SQL is a key to a lot of things and should definitely be considered as a learning point.

Another word of advice, if you can, try to not go more than 2 days w/o coding or practicing your coding if it's not your main focus, you will forget a lot of simple things. The "use it or lose it" mantra holds true. Every time I stop coding when life gets in the way, I find myself forgetting a lot; still haven't finished my website redesign :smh:
 
14,864
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Joined May 26, 2003
One thing is ww gotta stop making it aound like all you need to become a programmer is an online class lol. Cats really thing a bootcamp or workshop is going to make them programmers. Programming is not something you get into because you think its where the money is, you have to think a certain way to become a GOOD programmer. Coding is universal and most companies outsource a bulk of the stuff that isnt super complex, so we gotta stop setting these unreal expectations for people who arent in the industry.
 
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Modeanalytics has a food data analytics tutorial. Also code academy's SQL part 2 is good. But honestly data analytics is a hard a role to get into because all the math and advanced science majors like physics are competing in it
 
6,589
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Joined May 22, 2008
One thing is ww gotta stop making it aound like all you need to become a programmer is an online class lol. Cats really thing a bootcamp or workshop is going to make them programmers. Programming is not something you get into because you think its where the money is, you have to think a certain way to become a GOOD programmer. Coding is universal and most companies outsource a bulk of the stuff that isnt super complex, so we gotta stop setting these unreal expectations for people who arent in the industry.
I disagree. Bootcamps I don't necessarily agree with for beginners, but online resources such as Udemy, Udacity, CodeAcademy and Treehouse are more than adequate to get a person started on the path of programming. First off programming is as programming does. However you get the knowledge is less as important as getting the knowledge. And yes it takes practice and effort, but that goes for just about anything. Those courses serve as a great foundation in which a person can build on, it's been proven many times. You can learn to think in a certain way, let's not act like it's some purely genetic/ nature versus nurture concept. I mean if we're going to be real about it, there are more than a few people that graduate from computer science programs that are woefully inadequate when it comes to actually doing real world work. I say that to bring up the point that what matter is that you learn and practice and experiment and are active in the community.

Mark Cuban was NOT a school trained programmer. He actually got his degree in business. He got a job working as a salesman for a computer company. While doing that he figured he might as well start learning about computers so he started by reading manuals and reference books. Eventually he became a programmer and instead of working for a company he and his buddies started a computer firm and pioneered broadcasting radio and tv over the internet. Evenetually that company was bought by Yahoo and he became a billionaire. I'm sure there were many "real" programmers who knew much more than he did before he started learning.

I knew I should have just started this thread instead of asking somebody else to do it, because my purpose and aim was to inspire others to get into programming for various reasons. It wasn't meant to be a pompous or arrogant thread where people who are already in the field make it seem like it's the hardest thing in the world to do.

For the record I've already been in the industry without programming, I worked for Apple corporate, and ExxonMobil as a computing geologist where I worked side by side with their in house developers by testing and documenting their prototype and experimental projects, as well as working for the most technical of the spy agencies. It's not rocket science, and there are many benefits to learning to code that has nothing to do with looking for a job. Like I mentioned before my mentor when I interned at the Environmental Protection Agency was on the development team that wrote the code for the avionics for the F-16 fighter jet, and he always told me that coding is something he thought most people should learn just because...and he also warned me abvout the arrogance of programmers even though he himself was one.

This thread is for support, sharing ideas, keeping up with advances in programming, and to foster a community of coding/development at all levels. Please let's leave discouragement, arrogance, and negativity out of it.
 
14,864
4,145
Joined May 26, 2003
I disagree. Bootcamps I don't necessarily agree with for beginners, but online resources such as Udemy, Udacity, CodeAcademy and Treehouse are more than adequate to get a person started on the path of programming. First off programming is as programming does. However you get the knowledge is less as important as getting the knowledge. And yes it takes practice and effort, but that goes for just about anything. Those courses serve as a great foundation in which a person can build on, it's been proven many times. You can learn to think in a certain way, let's not act like it's some purely genetic/ nature versus nurture concept. I mean if we're going to be real about it, there are more than a few people that graduate from computer science programs that are woefully inadequate when it comes to actually doing real world work. I say that to bring up the point that what matter is that you learn and practice and experiment and are active in the community.

Mark Cuban was NOT a school trained programmer. He actually got his degree in business. He got a job working as a salesman for a computer company. While doing that he figured he might as well start learning about computers so he started by reading manuals and reference books. Eventually he became a programmer and instead of working for a company he and his buddies started a computer firm and pioneered broadcasting radio and tv over the internet. Evenetually that company was bought by Yahoo and he became a billionaire. I'm sure there were many "real" programmers who knew much more than he did before he started learning.

I knew I should have just started this thread instead of asking somebody else to do it, because my purpose and aim was to inspire others to get into programming for various reasons. It wasn't meant to be a pompous or arrogant thread where people who are already in the field make it seem like it's the hardest thing in the world to do.

For the record I've already been in the industry without programming, I worked for Apple corporate, and ExxonMobil as a computing geologist where I worked side by side with their in house developers by testing and documenting their prototype and experimental projects, as well as working for the most technical of the spy agencies. It's not rocket science, and there are many benefits to learning to code that has nothing to do with looking for a job. Like I mentioned before my mentor when I interned at the Environmental Protection Agency was on the development team that wrote the code for the avionics for the F-16 fighter jet, and he always told me that coding is something he thought most people should learn just because...and he also warned me abvout the arrogance of programmers even though he himself was one.

This thread is for support, sharing ideas, keeping up with advances in programming, and to foster a community of coding/development at all levels. Please let's leave discouragement, arrogance, and negativity out of it.
I work in the industry, and once again Programming is more than taking a boot camp or self taught course. You need to work on projects and such for some time to actually become SKILLED. People present this stuff as "teach yourself to code so you can make good money". Programming takes a certain type of thinker, I dont support selling people dreams being that I am actually in the trenches.

If dudes want to take a class to get their feet wet cool, but once again doing these free online code camps and stuff only gets your feet wet, its impossible to be taught the scenarios you will come across in software development, this is why one HAS to get hands on experience doing multiple projects. Even with 3 yrs of programming experience you are still considered a 'newbie'.

Like I said we need to set realistic expectations, nobody is saying something is impossible, what I`m saying is I`m sick and tired of the false stuff people put out there when it comes to stuff like this.

We gotta be real because I rather dudes know what they are getting into being that I was actually in their shoes before, rather than set themselves up for failure.

Not sure what Mark Cuban has to do with anything.

This is a thread for people who want to code, this isn't a tech start up thread. With the resources out today, you can start a tech company without knowing a lick of code, which is why I`m saying proper expectations need to be set.
 
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