The Oscars: 2020's 92nd Academy Awards, 8:30pm Feb 9th ABC

5,431
3,532
Joined Aug 22, 2012
Actual Best Pictures Past 10 years AKA My best picture winner list would look like ideally

10-Ing Bastards
11'-Social Network
12-Tree of Life
13-Django
14-12 Years
15-Grand Budapest Hotel
16-Sicario
17-Moonlight
18-3 Billboards
19-Really haven't seen most of them nor do I care that much about any of them of the ones I did see -Black Klansman & BP were both meh.

The picture I am most upset with not winning over the past decade is Sicario because it WASN'T even nominated smh.

Of the nominiated pictures, the most upset about not winning the past 10 years is between Bastards and Django, not because I'm a Tarantino stan or anything but because Argo and Hurt Locker were so terrible.
 
Last edited:
23,727
25,522
Joined Jan 17, 2009
Actual Best Pictures Past 10 years AKA My best picture winner list would look like ideally

10-Ing Bastards
11'-Social Network
12-Tree of Life
13-Django
14-12 Years
15-Grand Budapest Hotel
16-Sicario
17-Moonlight
18-3 Billboards
19-Really haven't seen most of them nor do I care that much about any of them of the ones I did see -Black Klansman & BP were both meh.

The picture I am most upset with not winning over the past decade is Sicario because it WASN'T even nominated smh.

Of the nominiated pictures, the most upset about not winning the past 10 years is between Bastards and Django, not because I'm a Tarantino stan or anything but because Argo and Hurt Locker were so terrible.
Why do you still get upset by the Oscars?
 
23,727
25,522
Joined Jan 17, 2009
Green Book’s big Oscar victory proves that the Academy, like America, still has a long way to go

The 91st Academy Awards ended not with a bang but a groan. At least that’s the sound I heard—and made, and inferred from the Twitter reactions—when America’s eternal sweetheart, Julia Roberts, tore open the final envelope and announced the big winner. It was a disheartening end to what had been, all things considered, a reasonably bearable Oscar night. Yes, Bohemian Rhapsody picked up four awards, which is embarrassing. But the ceremony itself was brisk and enjoyable—having no host didn’t hurt it one bit, nor did the absence of viral-courting comedy routines and fawning montages. Plus, a wide spectrum of films ended up winning, the Academy handing out prizes to Black Panther, Roma, Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse, First Man, If Beale Street Could Talk, and—in the night’s most welcome shock—Olivia Colman’s sublime tragicomic performance in The Favourite. It was all going about as well as could be expected. And then they had to go and give Best Picture to Green Book, that middlebrow road dramedy about beating racism, one zinger and bucket of KFC at a time.

It would be a stretch to call the win a big surprise. Anybody paying attention over this seemingly never-ending awards season knew that Green Book was always a real threat, especially in a year without any clear front-runner. (That all eight Best Picture nominees ended up winning at least one Oscar is a testament to how close this race might have been, to how much the enthusiasm was spread around.) Ultimately, it was probably naïve to think, as I and many others did, that the Academy was going to hand its top prize to a black-and-white foreign-language movie released by Netflix. But fearing and accepting the very real possibility of a Green Book victory didn’t dull the sting of, you know, that actually happening.

To these eyes, Green Book isn’t an awful film. Both of the lead performances, by Viggo Mortensen and newly minted two-time Best Supporting Actor winner Mahershala Ali, are more nuanced than they had to be. And as a longtime Farrelly brothers fan, I’ll personally admit that I found it a little amusing to see a standard, self-congratulatory Hollywood social-issues movie with a main character broad and goofy enough to have appeared in, say, Kingpin. Hell, it’s probably not even the bottom of the 2019 Best Picture barrel; that dishonor is reserved for Bohemian Rhapsody, a glorified parody of biopic clichés—an accidental Walk Hard—trying to pass itself off as the real thing. But if Green Book wasn’t the worst of the eight films up, it was almost certainly the most retrograde, in its ideas and filmmaking. You watch it and think, “I thought we had moved past this sort of thing”—a dismayingly common sentiment in 2019.


In one way or another, and not simply by comparison, many of the other nominees felt intrinsically modern. Green Book’s most obvious counterpoint in the lineup, the yin to its yang, was Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman, a very different period piece about racism in America—and one that almost felt, in its film-closing flash forward to Charlottesville, like a preemptive corrective to the more implicitly past-tense depiction of intolerance in Peter Farrelly’s movie. But the Academy didn’t need to hand Best Picture to Lee to celebrate a film more in the step with the here and now, to honor something more relevant. They could have gone with Black Panther, or The Favourite, or Roma—films new in perspective, angle, style, and/or release strategy. Even Vice, for its flaws, feels like a movie that speaks to the present. And A Star Is Born, at the very least, is built around the supernova charisma of a contemporary pop star.

Faced with these options, the Academy reached instead for the comfort food of a throwback. Some have already compared Green Book to perhaps the most notorious of Best Picture winners, Paul Haggis’ 2005 Crash, which also pivots around an unspoken, simplistic “Can’t we all get along?” But Farrelly’s movie is closer in tone and spirit to a Hollywood race drama from the late 1980s, the kind designed to reinforce how far we’ve supposedly come as a country by inventing or dramatizing inspirational stories of racism overcome—think Driving Miss Daisy redux, as Spike essentially quipped last night. It’s very last century, the way Green Book puts its famous black subject, Don Shirley, in not just the literal but also the figurative backseat of its story, prioritizing the emotional journey of his white employee, Tony The Lip. (That no one mentioned Shirley in the Best Picture acceptance speech, instead noting that “It all began with Viggo Mortensen,” betrays where interests lay.) Likewise, isn’t Tony something of a white savior figure in broad comic drag, saving the Doc’s *** over and over again? If the film has a philosophy, intentional or no, it’s that old saw about a racist whose prejudices are shattered by a truly exceptional person of color—a fantasy Lee himself dismantled in one conversation about black stars in Do The Right Thing, and which doesn’t exactly square with how this country reacted to the election of its first black president, a very exceptional man by most measures.


There is something uncomfortably Trumpian about Green Book’s victory—and not just because its now Oscar-winning screenwriter, Nick Vallelonga, is a kindred spirit in anti-Muslim conspiracy theory. Like our current president, the movie weathered a campaign beset with controversy: Beyond those since-deleted tweets, the PR team had to contend with the film’s star saying the N-word on stage, with the Shirley family publicly disputing the characterization of the central relationship, and with the unearthed revelation that Farrelly used to whip out his penis on set as a prank. In any other year, just one of these scandals might have toppled the film’s Oscar chances. But Green Booksurvived it all. Sound familiar?

To be clear, I don’t mean that this is a movie with a right-wing sensibility, exactly. Superficially, anyway, it’s well-meaning—against intolerance and for equality, with little that could be called explicitly dog-whistle racist (though scenes of Tony chastising the Doc for not knowing “[his] people’s” music or forcing him to try fried chicken are highly cringe-worthy). If anything, Green Book feels like a very centralist Democrat pick: a movie for people who self-identity as liberal but also feel nervous about “radical” identity politics. It’s a movie that Bradley Whitford’s character in Get Out would brag about seeing three times in theaters.


No, if there’s a strong whiff of the 2016 election to the end of last night’s Oscars, it’s more about the rejection of progress and the reaffirmation of old-school values, in this case cinematic as well as cultural. When Moonlight won two years ago, it felt groundbreaking, like a turning point for the Academy. Here was a genuinely independent movie, made on a small budget, about black identity and queer desire—the kind of film, in other words, that never wins Best Picture, and is generally seen as lucky to have even been nominated. (It’s also the rare case where the Oscars honored what might actually be the very best movie of the year, which is a true revolution for that organization.) Now, I doubt that those who voted for Green Book this year were staging anything like a conscious revolt or backlash against Moonlight and all its win meant for movie culture and the apparently evolving preferences of the Academy. But to pick Green Book among a lineup of hipper, fresher, more daring movies is to unconsciously express nostalgia for a different time—for a film that captures the feel, but also maybe the outdated cultural attitudes, of yesterday’s cinema. Even if you see nothing political in the win, it at the very least represents regressive taste: Make movies great again, etc.

Much has been made, here and elsewhere, of the “new Academy”—of the way the organization reshaped itself in the aftermath of the #OscarsSoWhite controversy, inviting members from around the world, attempting to at least give the appearance of diversifying its predominately old, white, and male membership. Many, myself included, presumptively attributed Moonlight’s victory to those new voices, including a bunch of international auteurs with assumedly much cooler sensibilities than those who have been picking Oscar winners for decades. Finally, we thought, the Academy is moving past antiquated ideas about what makes a film worthwhile. Without knowing who voted for what and why, Green Book’s victory suggests that the new Academy isn’t so different, at least in voting habits, from the old Academy. It suggests that this group still has a long way to go—and maybe that the Oscars, like the country where they’re held, progress slowly, taking one step back for every two steps forward. In more ways than one, let’s hope for a better outcome in 2020.


https://film.avclub.com/green-book-s-big-oscar-victory-proves-that-the-academy-1832883064#amp-uqYRujeV-EAZXCNLA-3e2PND3tjXXjerP_WTNDFhV8TO5iH9zWSEi-dcY95HWdp5
 

Attachments

Last edited:
19,256
32,205
Joined Dec 27, 2014
Actual Best Pictures Past 10 years AKA My best picture winner list would look like ideally

10-Ing Bastards
11'-Social Network
12-Tree of Life
13-Django
14-12 Years
15-Grand Budapest Hotel
16-Sicario
17-Moonlight
18-3 Billboards
19-Really haven't seen most of them nor do I care that much about any of them of the ones I did see -Black Klansman & BP were both meh.

The picture I am most upset with not winning over the past decade is Sicario because it WASN'T even nominated smh.

Of the nominiated pictures, the most upset about not winning the past 10 years is between Bastards and Django, not because I'm a Tarantino stan or anything but because Argo and Hurt Locker were so terrible.
Spotlight > Sicario

I loved Sicario though :nthat:
Definitely should've been considered.
 
9,539
7,186
Joined May 2, 2010
Actual Best Pictures Past 10 years AKA My best picture winner list would look like ideally

10-Ing Bastards
11'-Social Network
12-Tree of Life
13-Django
14-12 Years
15-Grand Budapest Hotel
16-Sicario
17-Moonlight
18-3 Billboards
19-Really haven't seen most of them nor do I care that much about any of them of the ones I did see -Black Klansman & BP were both meh.

The picture I am most upset with not winning over the past decade is Sicario because it WASN'T even nominated smh.

Of the nominiated pictures, the most upset about not winning the past 10 years is between Bastards and Django, not because I'm a Tarantino stan or anything but because Argo and Hurt Locker were so terrible.

Grand Budapest Hotel was tuff :nthat:

Very slept on film by most
 
19,256
32,205
Joined Dec 27, 2014
Best Picture:

“Ford v Ferrari”
“The Irishman”
“Jojo Rabbit”
“Joker”
“Little Women”
“Marriage Story”
“1917”
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”
“Parasite”

Lead Actor:

Antonio Banderas, “Pain and Glory”
Leonardo DiCaprio, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”
Adam Driver, “Marriage Story”
Joaquin Phoenix, “Joker”
Jonathan Pryce, “The Two Popes”


Lead Actress:

Cynthia Erivo, “Harriet”
Scarlett Johansson, “Marriage Story”
Saoirse Ronan, “Little Women”
Charlize Theron, “Bombshell”
Renee Zellweger, “Judy”


Supporting Actor:

Tom Hanks, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”
Anthony Hopkins, “The Two Popes”
Al Pacino, “The Irishman”
Joe Pesci, “The Irishman”
Brad Pitt, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”


Supporting Actress:

Kathy Bates, “Richard Jewell”
Laura Dern, “Marriage Story”
Scarlett Johansson, “Jojo Rabbit”
Florence Pugh, “Little Women”
Margot Robbie, “Bombshell”


Director:

Martin Scorsese, “The Irishman”
Todd Phillips, “Joker”
Sam Mendes, “1917”
Quentin Tarantino, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”
Bong Joon Ho, “Parasite”

Animated Feature:

“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World,” Dean DeBlois
“I Lost My Body,” Jeremy Clapin
“Klaus,” Sergio Pablos
“Missing Link,” Chris Butler
“Toy Story 4,” Josh Cooley


Animated Short:

“Dcera,” Daria Kashcheeva
“Hair Love,” Matthew A. Cherry
“Kitbull,” Rosana Sullivan
“Memorable,” Bruno Collet
“Sister,” Siqi Song


Adapted Screenplay:

“The Irishman,” Steven Zaillian
“Jojo Rabbit,” Taika Waititi
“Joker,” Todd Phillips, Scott Silver
“Little Women,” Greta Gerwig
“The Two Popes,” Anthony McCarten


Original Screenplay:

“Knives Out,” Rian Johnson
“Marriage Story,” Noah Baumbach
“1917,” Sam Mendes and Krysty Wilson-Cairns
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Quentin Tarantino
“Parasite,” Bong Joon-ho, Jin Won Han


Cinematography:

“The Irishman,” Rodrigo Prieto
“Joker,” Lawrence Sher
“The Lighthouse,” Jarin Blaschke
“1917,” Roger Deakins
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Robert Richardson

Best Documentary Feature:

“American Factory,” Julia Rieichert, Steven Bognar
“The Cave,” Feras Fayyad
“The Edge of Democracy,” Petra Costa
“For Sama,” Waad Al-Kateab, Edward Watts
“Honeyland,” Tamara Kotevska, Ljubo Stefanov


Best Documentary Short Subject:

“In the Absence,” Yi Seung-Jun and Gary Byung-Seok Kam
“Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone,” Carol Dysinger
“Life Overtakes Me,” Kristine Samuelson and John Haptas
“St. Louis Superman,” Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan
“Walk Run Cha-Cha,” Laura Nix


Best Live Action Short Film:

“Brotherhood,” Meryam Joobeur
“Nefta Football Club,” Yves Piat
“The Neighbors’ Window,” Marshall Curry
“Saria,” Bryan Buckley
“A Sister,” Delphine Girard


Best International Feature Film:

“Corpus Christi,” Jan Komasa
“Honeyland,” Tamara Kotevska, Ljubo Stefanov
“Les Miserables,” Ladj Ly
“Pain and Glory,” Pedro Almodovar
“Parasite,” Bong Joon Ho


Film Editing:

“Ford v Ferrari,” Michael McCusker, Andrew Buckland
“The Irishman,” Thelma Schoonmaker
“Jojo Rabbit,” Tom Eagles
“Joker,” Jeff Groth
“Parasite,” Jinmo Yang


Sound Editing:

“Ford v Ferrari,” Don Sylvester
“Joker,” Alan Robert Murray
“1917,” Oliver Tarney, Rachel Tate
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Wylie Stateman
“Star Wars: The Rise of SkyWalker,” Matthew Wood, David Acord


Sound Mixing:

“Ad Astra”
“Ford v Ferrari”
“Joker”
“1917”
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”


Production Design:

“The Irishman,” Bob Shaw and Regina Graves
“Jojo Rabbit,” Ra Vincent and Nora Sopkova
“1917,” Dennis Gassner and Lee Sandales
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Barbara Ling and Nancy Haigh
“Parasite,” Lee Ha-Jun and Cho Won Woo, Han Ga Ram, and Cho Hee


Original Score:

“Joker,” Hildur Guðnadóttir
“Little Women,” Alexandre Desplat
“Marriage Story,” Randy Newman
“1917,” Thomas Newman
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker,” John Williams

Original Song:

“I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away,” “Toy Story 4”
“I’m Gonna Love Me Again,” “Rocketman”
“I’m Standing With You,” “Breakthrough”
“Into the Unknown,” “Frozen 2”
“Stand Up,” “Harriet”


Makeup and Hair:

“Bombshell”
“Joker”
“Judy”
“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil”
“1917”


Costume Design:

”The Irishman,” Sandy Powell, Christopher Peterson
“Jojo Rabbit,” Mayes C. Rubeo
“Joker,” Mark Bridges
“Little Women,” Jacqueline Durran
“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Arianne Phillips


Visual Effects:

“Avengers Endgame”
“The Irishman”
“1917”
“The Lion King”
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”
 
69,041
23,715
Joined Nov 20, 2007
I've been waiting for them to announce nominees. Thought it wasn't until late Jan.

Thread title and OP change soon come.
 
3,936
2,190
Joined Sep 1, 2000
was hoping Watiti would get a best director Nom and even Rian Johnson for Knives Out. and Baumbach for Marriage Story.
Take out Tarantino and Phillips, nothing against either of them they made awesome movies, but Waititi, Johnson and Baumbach's films all relied heavily on their direction and they came out great.

now i gotta watch Bombshell. Little Women, and Harriet.

Really hope Pesci wins, I'm totally being a prisoner of the moment because I miss seeing him onscreen but damn he might've had my favorite performance this past year.

Screenplay categories will be interesting for sure.

Great movie year to me, outside of the CBM stuff. It's been a minute since the Oscars been this stacked.

I'm really switching between Parasite, Uncut Gems, OUTIH as my number one films
 
69,041
23,715
Joined Nov 20, 2007
So Adam Sandler got snubbed hard.

The Lighthouse got the wild snub imo. Only a best cinematography nomination. William Dafoe and Robert Pattinson deserved better.

Hope Parasite takes it all.
 
Last edited:
45,744
11,343
Joined Nov 24, 2009
I thought people were actually joking when they said jen lopez should get a nom for hustlers. Reporters this morning were thought she had a chance to get nominated.
 
39,800
19,391
Joined Dec 25, 2003
This was a pretty disappointing year for me.

Didn't particularly like Once Upon a Time, Parasite or Joker. If it were up to me 1917 and Marriage Story would sweep. :lol:

Sidenote: 1917 should have got a nom for editing. Kind of shortsighted to not recognize the genius in the editing of that movie.
 
Last edited:
2,273
267
Joined Feb 25, 2004
Adam Sandler :rofl:
Uncut Gems was not a great movie and if anything deserved an Oscar was the pawg.

Parasite, glad to see a foreign film with subtitles in the Best Film category as well. Definitely seeing this movie again.

So Adam Sandler got snubbed hard.

The Lighthouse got the wild snub imo. Only a best cinematography nomination. William Dafoe and Robert Pattinson deserves better.

Hope Parasite takes it all.
 
69,041
23,715
Joined Nov 20, 2007
was hoping Watiti would get a best director Nom and even Rian Johnson for Knives Out. and Baumbach for Marriage Story.
Take out Tarantino and Phillips, nothing against either of them they made awesome movies, but Waititi, Johnson and Baumbach's films all relied heavily on their direction and they came out great.
The limit for nominees for any category is like 10.

Phillips and QT arent taking up any slots. The academy purposely did not nominate those guys for best director same way Adam Sandler got snubbed.
I thought people were actually joking when they said jen lopez should get a nom for hustlers. Reporters this morning were thought she had a chance to get nominated.
She didn't. Her performance and the movie was pretty forgettable but they were serious.

If Charlize can get nominated for Bombshell then JLo getting nominated for Hustlers isnt a stretch..

Its been a pretty weak year for acting performances and great movies.
Adam Sandler :rofl:
Uncut Gems was not a great movie and if anything deserved an Oscar was the pawg.
May not have been a great movie to you but it was good enough and Sandler's performance was oscar nominee worthy at the least.
 
Last edited:
69,041
23,715
Joined Nov 20, 2007
Also I didnt see the Mr. Rogers movie cuz I saw the doc like a year before but how is Tom Hanks the supporting actor in that? :lol: :nerd:

Is Mr. Rogers not the main character?
 
42,888
50,763
Joined Mar 31, 2011
Also I didnt see the Mr. Rogers movie cuz I saw the doc like a year before but how is Tom Hanks the supporting actor in that? :lol: :nerd:

Is Mr. Rogers not the main character?
Apparently the movie is actually about some journalist and not really Mr. Rogers at all :lol:
 
Top Bottom